How Architect determines Substantial Completion date in AIA B201 § 1.1.4

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    Rebekka O'Melia

    Kirill,

    The definition of substantial completion is when the building can be occupied and used for its intended purpose.

    The building needs to be finished and all the systems up and running properly.

    If some minor things like a shelf is missing and paint needs to be touched up, that's ok.  But if the HVAC isn't working or it's a restaurant and not all the kitchen equipment has been installed, then it's not substantially complete because the restaurant cannot function without the equipment.

    Hope this helps!

    Rebekka O'Melia, Registered Architect, NCARB, B. Arch, M. Ed, Step UP,  Step UP ARE 5.0 Courses

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    Kirill Ryadchenko (Edited )

    Thanks, Rebekka O'Melia. 

    We know that during the Construction Administration phase the Architect is supposed to walk with the Contractor and inspect the Work to certify that Substantial Completion is achieved.

    But I'm wondering how Architect can estimate the date of Substantial Completion for the project's milestone schedule at the beginning of the project, before signing the contract.

    Before any design is done. At most an Architect would have a budget and a program. How with these variables Architect can estimate the Substantial Completion date?

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    Rebekka O'Melia (Edited )

    The contractor has a construction schedule and the A101 outlines the estimated date of substantial completion.  There could be liquidated damages even if the contractor doesn't finish on time (if that's outlined in the A101).  Of course things like bad weather, supplies not arriving on time, etc can cause delays.  A delay in substantial completion triggered by things beyond the contractor's control would trigger a change order to be issued.  

    The architect isn't going to determine the construction schedule.  We'd give the client a rough estimate. And we could advise the client if they have a timeline that is unrealistic, or recommend another delivery method or construction type to save time.

    Hope this helps!

    Rebekka O'Melia, Registered Architect, NCARB, B. Arch, M. Ed, Step UP,  Step UP ARE 5.0 Courses

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