Practice Management NCARB Practice Test

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    Kathleen Hogan

    I mean, considering that NCARB is the one making the ARE exams, I would definitely say that the practice tests are more similar (if not the exact same) to the actual exams than a third party, especially with its interface and timed practice simulation.

    I would suggest taking the NCARB practice exams primarily for the question structures and language being used (my issues with third party testing materials was that their language for the questions were very simplistic compared to the actual exam which would often times had to be read 2-3 times to understand what was being asked). 

    Not to say that third party testing is not a viable option. You can still test yourself for the content.

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    Courtney Prather

    Yes that was what I was thinking, but I was only concerned as there seemed to be content on the third party test not on the NCARB test. Items like memorizing the AIA contract numbers and names and calculating taxes. Should I still know those items to prep for the test?

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    Kathleen Hogan

    short answer, yes. personally it wouldn't hurt to know these things, but make sure that you understand what the questions are asking and keep in mind that they are testing concepts that are mentioned in the ARE 5.0 guide. 

     

    i would say yes, you should know the names and numbers of the AIA contracts - the 4 main contracts you should read in depth are A101 (owner/contractor), A201 (general conditions), B101 (owner/architect), and C401 (architect/consultant), but if they mention an obscure AIA document number, you should deduce what it means. 

    example: know what the difference is between AIA document A701 (instructions to bidders) and G701 (change order). you don't necessarily need to memorize what they are, but you can deduce by the classifications what they pertain. an A series pertains to owner/contractor agreements while a G series are related to forms relating to project management and construction administration. here are two links that describe the classifications:

    https://www.aiacontracts.org/contract-doc-pages/21536-what-we-do

    https://www.archtoolbox.com/aia-contract-document-numbering/

     

    i don't believe that calculating taxes would be worth your studying time - that may be a little too in depth. i'd say know how to calculate an architect's fee of a given project that also includes a percentage for the consultants and a percentage for profit.

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    Courtney Prather

    That makes sense thank you!

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