Completed ARE. Do I need to maintain my NCARB record?

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5 comments

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    Joseph Kraus

    Hi Brent,

    It's my understanding that the the main benefit is the ability to easily gain reciprocity to other states.  I'm in a similar situation where I just took my last ARE exam (hopefully, just waiting on my score report), and fulfilled all AXP and education requirements long ago.  My initial registration will be in Virginia, but with the NCARB record I could also get licensed in DC and/or MD relatively easily thru NCARB, which is fairly common the Northern VA market where I'm working.  

    You may not have any intentions of working in or working on a project in another state now, but maintaining your NCARB record would make that process easier should the need arise.  Otherwise trying to re-activate an NCARB record later would not only require a large amount of paperwork, but also would require paying for all missing yearly fees (up to 1,210 starting 7/1/2022) plus a $275 fee (again starting 7/1/22) assuming I am reading the fee's page correctly. https://www.ncarb.org/fees

    Additionally, the firm you are working for may reimburse you the cost of maintaining your NCARB record.  I know the firm I work for will reimburse the cost of exam fee's and license renewals.  I'm not certain if they will reimburse the NCARB record fee but that's something you may want to check into.

    - Joe

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    Brent Bumbaca

    Hi Joe,

    Thanks for the response. This is very helpful.

    Now for my complaint to NCARB! This is bogus! You make licensed Architects pay more money to not delete their record? I have to maintain an account because I might want to get licensed in another state someday? I get the transmittal fee if I choose to get licensed in another state, but maintaining an active record is useless for anyone not working towards licensure. You are literally providing no service and charging for one. This is unethical. A firm shouldn't even have to pay for this.

    I just wanted to voice this. 

    -Brent

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    NCARB (Edited )

    Hi Brent and Joseph,

    We want to provide some additional information to you on the NCARB Certificate. Similar to AIA, USGBC, or other professional organizations, the NCARB Certificate ("NCARB” credential in your title, which demonstrates you’ve met national standards for licensure) is a professional credential. Although it isn't a requirement to maintain a license to practice architecture, it does help you expand your professional reach.

    Having an NCARB Certificate gives you the flexibility to apply for reciprocal licensure in all 55 U.S. jurisdictions. The Certificate can also be used to support registration in Canada, Mexico, Australia, and New Zealand. In some jurisdictions, Certificate holders are able to interview for new work prior to acquiring a license in that jurisdiction.

    NCARB Certificate holders also have access to NCARB’s free continuing education courses as part of our Continuum Education Program, a collection of online self-study materials that help professionals maintain and expand their competence. 

    Again, you are not required to maintain a record with NCARB following initial licensure, however, there are many benefits of doing so, specifically if you apply for the NCARB Certificate. If you decide not to keep your record active, NCARB will continue to store all of your information on our secure servers including AXP, ARE, and educational transcripts. This allows you to reactive your record and easily apply for the NCARB Certificate at any time.

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    Brent Bumbaca

    Hi NCARB,
    If I understand correctly, maintaining an NCARB record will allow me to easily apply for licensure in all 55 US jurisdictions, correct? So the benefit of the certificate is the continuing education courses and ability to easily apply for licensure in the countries you listed? And I assume there is also a fee to get this certificate? This doesn’t bother me because you are providing a service.

    Again what I think is unfair here is charging architects for past years their NCARB record lapsed if they decide to apply for a license in another US jurisdiction. You aren’t providing any service if our accounts lapse, yet you charge for one when you make us back pay the years our accounts were inactive. That is unethical.

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    Hanwen Li

    I agree with Brent here. I will be charged with a transmittal fee which is already quite expensive  if I want to register in another state, yet before the transmittal I have to pay for the lapse annual fee which is 1,210 first,  this is quite a burden to an already stressed career in my opinion. If there is one thing NCARB can do to help the Architect profession is to make this record fee more reasonable.

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