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    Penelope Schmidt

    Google says " Neither the NFPA nor the ICC (International Code Council) requires that a proper riser room be provided for a fire sprinkler system's risers," however although I am finding lots of information about the location and size of the room, I am not finding much information about the enclosure structure. I think the answer could be "it depends on Local codes, both Fire and Building".  I am using UpCodes Chapter 7 and have not found anything yet.

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    Gang Chen

    Sprinkler pipes do not require rated protection and no rating is required on the riser room.

    Gang Chen, Author, AIA, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    Penelope Schmidt

    Ok got it! I'm surprised but I found great emphasis on the location, spacing and access to the riser pipes by the Fire department, but indeed nothing on the fire rating of the enclosure. Thanks, the question got me searching the Codes.

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    Gang Chen (Edited )

    Great! I am glad it was helpful.

    Gang Chen, Author, AIA, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    Gang Chen

    Why 12'-0" is a magic number for floor to floor height?

    Gang Chen, Author, AIA, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    ORKUN SENCER

    Stair needs landing after 12’ height.

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    Hadar Silverman (Edited )

    What created that standard of 12? was it driven by NFPA or moreso building economics?

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    Gang Chen

    Orkun,

    Yes, this is part of the IBC requirements:

    1009.6 Vertical Rise

    A flight of stairs shall not have a vertical rise greater than 12 feet (3658 mm) between floor levels or landings, except that the vertical rise shall not be greater than 8 feet (2438 mm) in Group A and I occupancies.

    Avoiding an intermediate landing can be a major saving, especially for apartment or condo, or prototype buildings that have some basic designs that are used again and again.

    Gang Chen, Author, AIA, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    Gang Chen (Edited )

    Does an electric room need to be fire rated or accessible?

    Gang Chen, Author, AIA, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    Gabriel Reyes

    Don't think electrical rooms need to be fire rated or accessible. They do require exit access and panic hardware if above or below a particular voltage. There is sprinkler exception because water will cause damage and harm. 

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    Gang Chen

    Correct, electrical rooms do not need to be fire rated or accessible.

    Can you give the specific code section that requires exit access and panic hardware if above or below a particular voltage?

    Gang Chen, Author, AIA, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    Penelope Schmidt

    Chapter 10 of the ICC has 1010.1.10 has specific mention of: But personally I was going to answer that the room DID need to be fire rated because that seemed logical to me but I have never been able to find information to support my deduction. Electricity - hazardous - fire spread. That was my logic but I guess that is why I better keep studying...

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    Gabriel Reyes

    NFPA 70 Section 110.26 and 110.33

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    Penelope Schmidt

    Is there free access online to NFPA? Thanks

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    Gabriel Reyes

    Yes, just sign up, it's free. 

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    Penelope Schmidt

    https://www.nfpa.org/Codes-and-Standards/All-Codes-and-Standards/Free-access 

    Yep I registered and have read only access. 

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    Gang Chen

    Should an architect show spot elevations of building entrances and corners on an architectural site plan? why?

    Gang Chen, Author, AIA, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    Yanina Mauro

    Yes, it's needed to compare with the FFE and see if it complies with local codes and Flood elevation of the site.

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    Gang Chen

    Should you still show these spot elevations if civil grading plans already show grading information?

    Gang Chen, Author, AIA, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    Gabriel Reyes (Edited )

    No, if these spot elevations are show on the civil plans, you don't need them on the your site plan. Civil, Landscape and Site plans show different information.

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    Gang Chen

    What is the maximum travel distance to toilets in covered and open mall buildings? How about other buildings?

    Gang Chen, Author, AIA, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    Gang Chen

    Gabriel,

    For the purpose of ARE, your answer is correct. The reason is that everything should only be shown once on a set of construction documents. This way, if something changes, you only need to change it once and you avoid the possibility of conflicts.

    Besides getting an architect license, I think it is more important for us to be come a better architect. Here are some information to help you to achieve your goal if you are interested:

    To do or not to do, I have heard both sides of arguments, and based on past experience, I think sometimes some redundancies are necessary. In this case, showing these spot elevations probably will have more benefits that not showing them:

    1. In the early stages of the project, the grading plans are very rough and lack details. Based on reviewing the general grades around the building, an architect can show these spot elevations (grades) to use them as a tool to tell the civil engineers what s/he wants to see around the building. It is a very effective communication tool to coordinate with the civil engineer.
    2. These grades are connecting points to tie a building to its context.
    3. As a project progress, a civil engineer probably will change the grades a few times. If you show these grades, you will notice the differences between what the civil engineer shows and what you show on the site plan right away, the conflicts are clearly shown on the plans. You want that. If you do not show these grades, it is harder for you to notice these changes made by the civil engineer.

    Gang Chen, Author, AIA, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    Penelope Schmidt

    1) What is the maximum travel distance to toilets in covered and open mall buildings? 

    Ans:- IBC chapter 29 .(2902.3.4) says 300ft

    2) How about other buildings?

    Ans:- IBC chapter 29 (2902.3.3) says 500ft

     

    ) says 

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    Gang Chen (Edited )

    Good. Here comes the next one:

    Does an elevator machine room need to be fire rated or accessible?

    Gang Chen, Author, AIA, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    Gabriel Reyes

    Do you mean the actual elevator or elevator machine room? The actual elevator needs to be fire rated and accessible per 3008. Elevator machine rooms for solid-state elevator controls are to have an independent ventilation or air conditioning system to protect against overheating of control equipment. 

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    Hadar Silverman (Edited )

    Section 3005 indicates that machine room access needs to have an "approved means of access" but does not anywhere indicate that it needs to be accessible, assuming that in this case 'accessible' refers to ADA requirements.

    Fire barriers are required for machine rooms, the ratings of which need to meet or exceed that of the hoistway.  What that rating is depends heavily on context / adjacencies. 

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    Gang Chen (Edited )

    Gabriel,

    Good catch! My typo. I meant to ask if an elevator machine room needs to be rated. You have not answer this question yet.

    Gang Chen, Author, AIA, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    Gang Chen (Edited )

    Hadar,

    Yes,  in this case 'accessible' refers to ADA requirements. 

    Gang Chen, Author, AIA, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    Gang Chen

    What is the maximum length of a dead end corridor?

    Gang Chen, Author, AIA, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    Gabriel Reyes

    20 feet and in some cases (sprinklered and certain occupancies) 50 feet.

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