Can someone explain "No exception taken"?

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    David Kaplan

    Minquan,

    The important thing to understand here is that means and methods are ALWAYS the responsibility of the contractor and not the architect.  We don't get involved with means and methods.  In this example, everything else in the shop drawing was found to be in general conformance with our drawings other than the means and methods.  Since it is not our responsibility to be reviewing those, this is why the shop drawing is marked "no exception taken" on our end. 

    If in fact the means and methods that the architect felt were risky turn out to be proven so, that's on the contractor - not us.  Commenting on means and methods could also expose us to liability in this case.  

    Hope that helps.

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    Marek Pula (Edited )

    The term "no exceptions taken" means that we have in fact looked at/reviewed the shop drawings and we don't see anything particular that is wrong with them. The reason that "approved" and "accepted" are wrong is because they imply that we swear by these drawings and that our approval will make us responsible. At the end of the day the shop drawings are not the responsibly of the architect so why open ourselves up to the liability.

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    Gang Chen

    Every architect’s office has a shop drawing review stamp. One way to prepare for ARE 5.0 is to read and understand all choices on that stamp, and the cover-your-back language/ fine print on that stamp, typically it includes some key phases from an AIA document, such as the architect’s review of shop drawing does not include the dimensions and quantities of the items submitted, etc.

    Gang Chen, Author, Architect, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    Giovanni Succi (Edited )

    Qiang,

    yes, normally architectural firms have predefined stamps, with all drawing review answers listed with a corresponding check-box.

    You do not have to make up a response, it is already there, like a multiple choice.

    However, if you do Google "submittal stamps", or similar searches, you will see that "Approved" and "Accepted" language is very frequent, which is unfortunate, since it is wrong.

    Despite I have done my share of submittals reviews, this would have thrown me off as well, since I cannot remember exactly the wording of the stamps I have used in the past, although I do remember the option "No Exception Taken" was the way to "approve" the submittal at at least one firm I worked for.

    Here are a couple of samples stamps I found:

     

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    Gang Chen (Edited )

    If the submittals from the contractor are NOT required by the construction documents, the architect can return them to the contractor without taking any action.

    Gang Chen, Author, Architect, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    Gang Chen

    No exception taken is the correct language.

    When we review shop drawings, most of the time, the contractor submit 6 sets, we often mark up one set, and then ask a junior member of our team to copy the mark-ups on the remaining 5 sets and ship them to the proper parties. If you have dealt with shop drawings in a senior or junior capacity, you will know which choice to pick. This question makes sense and is testing something an architect does in almost every project.

    See link below for explanation of the term:

    https://www.lawinsider.com/dictionary/no-exceptions-taken

    Gang Chen, Author, Architect, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    QIANG ZU

    Thank you for the question. I wonder in practice of reviewing the shop drawings, does architect use predefined “stamps” with various expression to respond to contractors? Are there any other words that maybe used as a response?

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