Using space heating (or fan) to heat (or cool) the room used for testing (Online Proctoring)

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    Kawai Yam

    Did you get an answer ?

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    Richard Balkins

    The answer I had on the phone with NCARB was that it is "probably" okay as long as it isn't loud and that if you have a remote control (and the heater should be located so it is not immediately in reach of you during the exam so you aren't setting the temperature settings while in exam session. When on break, I suppose you can make adjustments but whatever you do, don't try to be "sneaky" about it. My heater has a timer setting as well as able to be turn off at temperature and continue to keep the temperature steady with intermittent heating throughout the hours I set up to 8 hours which is adequate for heating the room before an exam, throughout the exam, and for a period of time after the exam. You should place it in such a way that it isn't a problem and that the heater doesn't come across the mic. You might be able to adjust your headset mic sensitivity.

     

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    Richard Balkins

    For what it is worth, I can't say anything is officially stated so you may want to get further confirmation from NCARB and also from the proctor. You still need to maintain a "clean desk policy" compliance with the immediate area of your exam where you are conducting the exam. That's my non-official recommendation. 

     

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    NCARB

    Hi Richard,

    I can confirm that a space heater is acceptable to have within an online proctored environment, however, it may be subject to inspection by the Prometric readiness agent. Fans are bit tricky because some can be extremely loud. As long as the fan doesn't interfere with the audio stream to the proctor, it would be acceptable. 

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    Kawai Yam

    Is table divider allowed to be used for testing, instead of covering the whole room? 

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    Richard Balkins

    Lets be clear: 

    REMOTE PROCTORING:

    ONLY ONE PERSON IN THE ROOM DURING TESTING.

    Keep it simple and don't try to complicate things any more than needed. It seems like you are trying to have other people in the room? Use a small room like a bedroom or similar size room that is about 100 sq.ft. One person in the room during testing is explicitly stated in the rules. 

    At test centers, they can have multiple test takers in the room because they have in-person proctors monitoring the testing and can see if someone is looking at someone else's screen and all. 

    My question is a reasonable one so I can heat and cool the room adequately. I appreciate NCARB's response. They need to see the whole room in the check in process and one of the reason is so they can confirm that NO ONE ELSE IS IN THE ROOM WITH YOU.

    If you are unable to meet these rules, test at the test centers.

     

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    Richard Balkins

    NCARB, thanks for the response. 

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    Kawai Yam

    I am not trying or saying other people will be in the room with me. Not everyone is lucky that they can go to the test centers as they wish to. My local one has been closed or keep rescheduled my tests. I just want to use the dividers to block off my shelves and cluster spaces. You might think it is standard for everyone to have their own small room or bedroom by themselves. Not everyone is that lucky. I am sharing living spaces in my rental. I can ensure that no one will come to my space during the test. but I just want to see if I can use dividers to block off other people's stuff for the exam. And I did read the rules. But thanks. 

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    Richard Balkins (Edited )

    Are you currently employed and normally working from home? If so, consider talking with your employer in setting up a room in the firm's office so test takers can go to that room during their exam. In any case, I think none of the books should be or are allowed to be on the same table with the computer. You might be in a more complicated situation. It isn't really a matter of "luck". Covering the books in some fashion that you can't outright read the title on the binding side and also not being in reach of being grabbed. So, not within 2 ft of your maximum reach in any possible direction including leaning. I have to work a bedroom so I can. 

    The biggest issue I see with table dividers is if it is opaque, it can possibly block view of the camera when they need to perform the room scan when they need to see the whole room. If it is transparent/clear then it may or may not be easily noticed on the camera. Can you post an example of table dividers you are looking at and how you plan to implement? Look at the videos from the proctors (Prometric and PSI) and look at the example of spaces they are looking at for example of what you need to do to setup the space compliant for the exam.

    Only NCARB and the proctors can fully determine if your testing space is compliant. 

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    Richard Balkins

    I don't think there is any issues regarding using book shelf dividers to place a divider between your books and the other person's books. Putting the books into some totes/storage containers and placing it under the bed or somewhere out of reach or otherwise maybe acceptable especially if it is tidied up and all.

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    Richard Balkins (Edited )

    You may notice the example spaces are tidier than is commonly found. I don't know your particular rented space is setup. They are usually apartments or houses a bit bigger than a 200 to 250 sq.ft. apartment in New York City.

     

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    NCARB (Edited )

    Kawai,

    Good question on the table divider. This would not work for an online proctored exam since the entire space needs to checked by the Prometric readiness agent, not just the area within the table divider. Your testing space is subject to all online proctoring policies regardless of the divider.

    The easiest approach is to cover up shelves and clutter with sheets. Check out this test setup video on our YouTube channel. 

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