Table 1006.2.1, huh?

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    Kevin Griendling

    Yes. You are reading that chart correctly.

     

    Kevin Griendling, AIA

    http://xQ.intersectartsstudio.com 

    http://www.pluralsight.com 

     

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    Jonathan Chertok

    thanks a lot for that kevin!

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    David Kaplan

    Jon,

    I'd just like to clarify that you need to meet BOTH the occupant load and common path of travel requirements in order to say that one exit is okay from a space, not just one of those.  That chart must be fully followed.  Just want to make sure you weren't confused, because above you said, "I see 49 in maximum occupant load of space so I know it's OK to have on exit?"  That would not be true if the space you're talking about had 33 people (so yes you'd meet the occupant load) but there was more than 75' of common path from that space.  It has to be both, not just one.

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    Jonathan Chertok

    hi david. thanks again for your help personally and also to your ongoing help to the community more generally.
    can i just ask you. i am trying to build up a little “muscle memory” on some of these. so it helps to make sure i have the proper terms because they sort of switch around a tiny bit in the code imho.
    you are saying to use this chart for determining the length allowed for common path of egress. for instance inthe example i used above.
    but that you would also use a chart - do you know offhand the number of this chart? - to determine how many paths you would need? or how many doors you would need? or both?
    sometimes discussing it i find a lot easier to confirm what i am actually trying to decipher from the code.
    sort of having it verbally explained helps!
    or did i butcher that...?

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    David Kaplan

    Jon,

    Man you did butcher that.  I can't quite figure out the confusion.  The title of Table 1006.2.1 is "Spaces with One Exit or Exit Access Doorway."  Therefore, this chart is what you use to determine spaces that are allowed to have one exit or exit access doorway.  In that chart, there's two criteria - occupant load and common path of travel - for each use group.  You then look at your space on your floor plan that you're trying to plan out and, using this chart you say to yourself, "does the occupant load of this space exceed the number listed, and, is the common path of travel from it in excess of the number indicated?"  

    That's it.  

     

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    Jonathan Chertok

    thanks david. i have a bunch of things going on and should have checked the code before responding on my phone.

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    Kevin Griendling

    Jonathan,

    Another word of advice, we are all doing you a favor by taking time out of our day to stop and answer your questions. We do open the code, to make sure our response are correct, and we are not leading you astray.

    The community expects that you give us the same courtesy. I have probably spent 2-3 hours of my time responding to your questions in the last week. Questions that after reading this response likely took you only 30 seconds to write. That time is not billable, that time is taken away from my own life and responsibilities and building my own business.

    Do your homework, check the code, write clear concise questions about specific issues you just cannot figure out on your own.

    Give us the same courtesy we are giving you, and do not post questions before you've thoroughly researched them. We are all busy.

     

    Kevin Griendling, AIA

    http://xQ.intersectartsstudio.com 

    http://www.pluralsight.com 

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    Jonathan Chertok

    kevin. always great advice.
    just factor in that the window in the OS is 1/4” tall and there does not seem to be a good way to attach images here. so when trying to find something specific in the code one has to 1. determine if it is important to testing 2. figure out where it is in the code and 3. translate a visual understanding of the code (we are in architecture) into something we can fit in a 1/4” uneditable interface on the internet.
    it’s not always going to be pretty. but again can we try to keep comments specific to the topic? it’s unproductive to delve into these elaborate side threads!

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    Jonathan Chertok

    follow up to david here. thanks. got it. i accidentally thought i was working with a different chart on this reply. big time apologies...

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    Kevin Griendling

    Jonathan,

    There is a perfectly good way to upload photos. The button is right here (image example/illustration has been uploaded by using said button):

    Copy and paste also works.

    If you cannot upload mobile, wait until you get to a computer instead of forcing your question to be basically unanswerable.

     

    Kevin Griendling, AIA

    http://xQ.intersectartsstudio.com 

    http://www.pluralsight.com 

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    Jonathan Chertok

    hi david.
    hope you are on this one still.
    i’m looking at the code here and i do in fact see that Table 1006.2.1 stipulates an OCCUPANCY TYPE, then the OCCUPANT LOAD and then the maximum allowable common path of egress.
    seemingly in that order?
    the next Table is 1006.3.1 which appears to be specifying the “Maximum Number of Exits or Access to Exits per Story”. is there any way you can help with what this table is?
    or more generally with how the code determines number of required exits or (also) maximum common path distance when there is a larger occupant load or a longer common path required? or i guess at least with respect to common path it has to be under whatever the code specified for that occupancy type and that occupants load presumably. but where do you go when you have a larger occupant load than what is shown in 1006.2.1 please? because presumably at that larger occupant load you move to a shorter common path of travel basically.
    if that makes sense.

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    David Kaplan

    Jon,

    There is no Table in the building code that would ever stipulate the "maximum" number of exits.  Buildings would want you to have as many exits as possible.  If the entire building were one giant exit stair to get people out - awesome!  I think you mean "minimum."  You've gotta be careful.  I will echo words about that it would be really helpful if you could copyclip the image of the table you're looking at.  

    The table that identifies minimum number of exits per story looks at the full story of the building.  The table this forum string was started with however dealt with SPACES in the building.  Now we're zooming out and looking at the full floor plan, and this new table tells you, given the occupant load ranges, how many exits you need for that story based on occupant load of the entire story.

    There is a relationship between these two tables.  First and foremost, you should use Table 1006.3.2, minimum number of exits or access to exits per story, and just based on the occupant load of the floor determine how many exits you'll need from that floor.  However, Table 1006.2.1, which then has you go into each one of your spaces on that floor and analyze their occupant load and common paths of travel, might affect the number of exits you need.  You might find that while 1006.3.2 says you only need 2 exits from the story, that there are instances on that story you're analyzing where your common path of travel to those 2 exits gets exceeded and your only solution is to add a third exit to the building.  These work hand in hand.

    This is the best I can do at this point, I'm off this string.  You also should give Kevin Griendling a bit of a break.  He is trying to help as well and is simply asking that you focus a bit and maybe just ask one or two questions at a time.  It just makes it much easier for us to focus our answers.  

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