Digital Whiteboard (Demonstration exam)

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5 comments

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    Kathryn O'Regan

    I do better work in MS Paint, for real.

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    Cassandra Cook

    You can actually read what you wrote!  I couldn't get a single legible letter.

    I'm cancelling my exam, this is a joke.

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    Richard Balkins (Edited )

    Cassandra, 

    The fact that I actually tried to make it legible and without the time pressure of the exam. Imagine trying to do that in the 15-20 seconds that you might have to be sketching or putting down a note.

    What we know is.... and I did employ the use of in the image above is the use of the text box. If what you are needing to jot down is textual, use it. Don't even attempt to waste your time sketching textual information. Just use the keyboard and the text box. The drawing tool is meant for sketching stuff of pictorial nature. The problem is actually controlling the lines. If I need to sketch a graph involving moments and similar issues, it would be an issue because the lines are squiggly and kind of a bit more uncontrolled than it is with a pen or pencil. I can use the Wacom graphic tablet and the lines would be particularly cleaner. No special software installed. As with anyone who actually knows how operating systems like Windows works, they know, there is always some driver installation process even though it doesn't mean an external software application is required to make it work. In effect, the low-level drivers that Windows installs from their database of drivers on the operating system installed on the hard drive and through Microsoft's Windows update would install as it would with the mouse. Once it is installed, the OS will just detect when the device when you plug it in and then it will initialize the drivers. You do that before you start some app like ProProctor or PSI Bridge, there shouldn't even be an issue because the operating system (at least with Windows 10 and probably even back to Windows 7 or 8, it should be automatic and the operating system does this at OS/Kernel level power and authority which would supersede even that of ProProctor or PSI Bridge. These OS versions had already started to use these devices in a mode of operation like "mouse" mode. Which is all it really needs to do. Additional functionality or macro-programmed buttons would not likely work when running ProProctor or PSI Bridge or any such software. It should run like a mouse in the sense that as you move the stylus across the pad, it moves it across the screen because the graphic tablets used here are functioning a manner like the touch pad on laptops. It is low-level drivers and OS level APIs that are managing the technical stuff even though the technical hardware way of how a Wacom tablet works is different than a touchpad or a touch screen but from a user level, they would operate the same. So, simple functionalities would be available to wacom tablets like the "One by Wacom" tablet or even other models of graphic tablets by Wacom (models without a computer video display) such as the left and right mouse button functionality and the reading the position of the stylus mapping to pointer position on the display. It may not have the extra precision of "stylus" mode or the extra stuff you can do with the graphic tablets on the more fancier models. Even then, from my experience, using the "One by Wacom" GRAPHIC TABLETS*, they will achieve better results in sketching than you would a mouse.

    * NOTE: GRAPHIC TABLETS not iOS or Android "smart" tablets like smart phone. They just share the tablet name but these iOS/Android tablets are all-in-one computers with touch screen, on-screen keyboard, and possibly an attachable or wireless keyboard.

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    Chastise rant to NCARB and Prometric and by extension to PSI and other parties.

    Prometric and possibly PSI will need to teach their staff and proctors the difference between a Android/iOS tablet computer ("smart tablets") and graphic tablets and then knowing that there are displays by Wacom such as the Cintiq which is a display. In which case, the feature of a computer video display as a second screen would make that particular line of devices not permitted for testing. However, the rules relating to graphic tablets that don't have any sort of display be it the Wacom type that uses electro-magnetic resonance micro-grids to sense your stylus location and moving the mouse pointer accordingly, OR even a touchpad where you use your finger as a stylus, should be relaxed to allow such devices provide security features are in place so special functionality from pre-programming functionality of buttons on a graphic tablet aside from the basic left/right mouse button click even function. This is a matter of programming. 

    Issues arise with the proctors more than anything. The issue that I'm not yet ready to decide to subject myself to this sort of non-sense issue we are currently getting at the moment. Even if the Wacom tablet poses no adverse issue whatsoever, the proctor can refuse to allow the device for use during the exam during the check-in process. 

    The simplest model of the Wacom tablet, designed with children in mind with the most basic functionality in that the tablet part has zero buttons and the stylus has only two buttons and those buttons signals are transmitted to the computer via the tablet through the usb drivers. No bluetooth or WiFi communication. 

    What I hear from NCARB is policies determined by people who frankly doesn't even have a clue as to how things work from a technological point of view. A person who knows technology well enough could enable them to have more nuance acceptance like having a list of approved graphic tablets and others can be added through a process of testing the software in the "secured browser" environment. I can test models of tablets if provided the secure browser and a "dummy" exam like the demo exam because it isn't the real exam. Of course, I would have to be sent the tablets to test. I can't buy one of each model and make for obvious financial reasons. Certain criteria would have to be met like no computer display that can show either a mirrored or extended desktop of your computer. Similarly, a device such as a iphone/ipad or Android devices would not qualify for the key established rules.

    Simple as that NCARB. Don't try to over complicate that. It isn't that complicated. Prometric and PSI, the point also applies to you. 

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    Richard Balkins

    Cassandra, I certainly can understand the difficulty to draw something barely legible. However, it would likely cause carpal tunnel syndrome or related issues in the wrist and hand because even in a relatively short time to do that, it was causing pain in the wrist and hand. Imagine that over an exam. The mouse is not properly designed for drawing. This is why graphic tablets were invented and why one of the founders of Koala Pad company was inventing graphic tablet technology in his and the tech patents that went to a variety of companies. Wacom evolved the tech further with use of their own patented EMR process.

    The mouse serves fine in a WIMP (point and click, windows, mouse, and pointer) GUI environment. Graphic tablets serves a particular area of use such as computer graphics. 

    If you want to draw or sketch something you use a pencil/pen and paper, the graphic tablet is a digital version following a similar intuitive paradigm. It also more easier to work and sketch when using a tool designed for the job than something that is not. I've done drawing with a mouse but then this work is time consuming pixel level work which was easier to use a game pad (digital 4-way D-pad) or classic joystick. I even used a device back in the CRT displays era called light pens. Light pens were great with the biggest drawback was you have to have your are up towards the screen and so forth. There was some other subtle drawbacks of light pens precision but that isn't beyond being able to address pixel level stuff when you "zoom" in and pixels are now represented by 8x8 pixels (character cell, card, tile or whatever you want to call it). You have to zoom back to 1px:1px (0% magnification) and see the work. 

    The best approach with the current tools for text is to use the text tool and type it. To get some of the symbols used for math, I would have to use the Alt-codes (which I haven't tried but to remember them while doing the ARE exam would be annoying and for those less experienced in computer programming would likely be pissed to learn that along with the stuff they need to learn for the ARE. I would seriously hope no one would have to use such math that they would need to use those symbols in their notes. If I have use symbols that would require me to enter the unicode via keyboard into the text box, I would probably want to..... well lets just say it wouldn't be gentle and kind.

    Trying to draw with a mouse is terrible.

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    Richard Balkins

    ╒or what its worth,  ÑÇÅRß.... I have some idea on how to use Alt codes.

     

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