“private” versus “public” for plumbing fixtures and other code related designations?

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    Jonathan Chertok

    its example 31.2 on page 32-17.

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    David Kaplan

    Jon,

    I can say for certain that there is no such thing as a "private" fixture in the eyes of the building code.  Only instance I can think of is that with respect to accessibility, Code does have some exceptions for if/when fixtures are located in a private office then they don't necessarily have to be accessible.  But, when calculating the number of required fixtures for a building, there is no "public" or "private."  You take your building's Use Group, go to the plumbing fixture charts, and do your calculation.  That will be what you'll do for the exam as well.  There won't be any ambiguity here for the exam.  

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    Jonathan Chertok

    THANK YOU david. i saw later that the previous question in ballast clarified that the building was considered public.
    in the chart in ballast they show both a public number and a private number. which is kind of weird and confusing i guess(?).
    anyway. you are right i guess about everything bring picking in IBC. i couldn’t think about this clearly.
    can i please ask if you can think of any kind if related code ambiguity i should be sure not to be confused about? i seem to remember at least one but i can’t really think of it.
    seems like there would be a lot?
    anything in occupancy?
    fire walls?
    other?!

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    David Kaplan

    Jon,

    My experience is that the test aligns itself with the correct and direct usage of IBC and ADA.  Meaning, there is no ambiguity.  They'll ask you a question that involves using the codes to get the answer, give you those code excerpts, and if you know how to use them correctly you will get the right answer.  I truly don't believe there is any ambiguity with respect to these questions and they were all cut and dry for me.

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    Jonathan Chertok

    thanks as always david.
    i appreciate you.
    so just as a kind of mental checklist for myself - what about for numbers in this respect? meaning what would be good number-wise not to make a mistake on?
    not dividing by two when calculating sinks and toilets? but urinals you use the original number?
    not dividing by troy when calculating edit stairway (or whatever) width?
    ALSO - in terms of code it is not always straightforward for a lot of people that may have never been responsible for doing any commercial code. i mean i would say 80% of the industry never so much as cracks IBC. is there anything in IBC relative to PDD that even comes close to being confusing?!

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    David Kaplan

    I really don't know how to answer this question, it's really more a subjective thing.  What you may find confusing might not be confusing to others.  I personally found it all to be straightforward on the test.  I say this however with over 12 years of being the one in our office that handles all of the Code research.  I don't fall into the 80%.  I found that the test did not reference abstract sections of the code that aren't used as much. You will get questions that deal with "most" projects as they relate to code.  Highly, highly doubt that you will be asked something more obscure like Hazardous Use Group quantities.  

    Yes, for plumbing fixtures you need to divide the occupant load in half and those two numbers become Male and Female, and then you go from there.  Know as well to always round up.

    Egress - you just need to be able to apply the factors that the code gives you when calculating the required width, and be on the lookout for exceptions to the code that permit you to use different factors.  You best believe they will throw that in there.  

    Know how to calculate occupant load using the table in Chapter 10, and know as well to always round up.

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    Jonathan Chertok

    THANK YOU david!

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    Gang Chen (Edited )

    David,

    Totally agreed. Exit widths calculations based on occupant load is one of those frequently IBC sections, make sure you know the exceptions too. I believe a sample question in NCARB handbook actually tested one of the exceptions.

    Gang Chen, Author, Architect, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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    Jonathan Chertok

    hi david, GC.
    THANK YOU gents.
    would anyone mind just quickly walking me through the exceptions? i’ve been through this calculation a bunch previously and i have the ibc commentary but i also find it very helpful actually discussing a topic like this.
    THANKS

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    Gang Chen

    The IBC tables on occupant load, exit width, and plumbing fixture calculations are used everyday for almost every one of the projects, and I can guarantee you they will be tested in the ARE exams. Make sure you read and know how to use the exceptions listed under each of these tables too.

    Gang Chen, Author, Architect, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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