Any non NAAB candidates testing / licensed ?

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    Mollie Pelletier

    If I’m reading correctly, i think you’re asking about getting licensed without a professional degree.

    I have a 4 year Bs Arch, graduated in ‘98. I finished testing in March. Got initial license in TN which i have to hold for three years plus twice AXP hours to earn NCARB certificate which then reciprocated to my home state.

    That’s what i hear anyway. I confirmed it with NCARB.

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    Arman Bostani (Edited )

    Thanks for the feedback Mollie. 

    Just curious to know how many others are/have been pursuing the license without a NAAB degree and sharing the experience. I will eventually take the CSE, but as soon as my PDD pass is official, I will contact other boards to get the initial license as it will open opportunities for me here at work.

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    Canuto DeLeon

    Congratulations on the pass Arman! 

    I'm also a BS Arch, graduate of the lucky class of 13', and I'm testing in Tennessee. Recently completed my AXP and 5 year experience requirement for non-accredited in this jurisdiction. I've only tested in 5.0 and got 4 passes with PPD & PDD to go. I've failed each exam once so far, and studying my tail off to slay PPD & PDD in a few weeks. My family is actually going to visit family for thanksgiving while I stay at home to study for the 4 day weekend.

    Wish i had advice for how to tackle the California requirements. Good Luck!

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    Shaun Blomquist

    I am also testing without an accredited degree. Graduated from the University of Minnesota in 2005 with a BA Arch, a non NAAB accredited degree. I live in Minnesota which requires NAAB, so I am getting my initial license next door in Wisconsin. My firm practices all over the country, so the license alone is important. Passed CE in August, failed PcM last week. It wasn't the material, I basically ran out of time and had to rush the case studies (very poor test strategy). Was frustrated for a few days, now back at it. 

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    Michelle NCARB

    Arman,

    Some jurisdictions do have a licensure path for candidates without NAAB-accredited degrees, but as Canuto mentioned, they often have additional experience requirements.  For more info, check out the Licensing Requirements Tool on NCARB's website.  Click on the button that says "Additional experience can be accepted as an alternative to the education requirement."  From there, you can click on the jurisdiction names to get more information (then click "Explore View" to get back to the list).  You can also contact NCARB for more information and/or reach out to Boards directly to better understand their process.

    Congrats on the last pass.  Hope this helps!

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    Arman Bostani (Edited )

    Thank you Michelle and all for your feedback. CA is also an jurisdiction for which non NAAB degree is not an issue. My home state of NY is another one. I will begin the process of doing the paper work + NCARB coordination right after the holidays.

    Canuto and Shaun and anyone else reading this, please don't be discouraged and keep taking the tests. I started a long time ago. Then the PPP gave me hell and finally the 2008/0 crash really did me in. So I pretty much had to do it all over and then transitioned in 5.0..... Just don't get bogged down with all the comments on the this or any other forum. We are all different in our way of learning studying etc.

    For the 5.0 my experience has been with the PPD and PDD. My advise is to learn the general concepts, really understand Construction Methods and Materials. Frankly I feel like someone like myself with more of a technical background has a better edge than someone whose focus is primary of the artistic side of the design. Once at the examination, put most of your effort in doing the non-case study portion of the exam. Think about it, the case study questions have the same points as the rest, but man do they take a long time to go through (especially with the NCARB's exam software lag. Frankly I wasn't able to distinguish the PPD and PDD contents in both exams. Maybe it was just the set of questions I got but most likely due to the fact that really overlap in context. I think NCARB's approach with the new format that is more "concept and understating  based" when it comes to structures and building systems is a major plus. As someone who took and passed GS, LF , BS (all former 4.0 divisions), I think each individual section was overkill for an architect. (I don't say this lightly as I had to repeat everything after the clock ran out l!) Its been a long journey and for me, it became a personal mission to finally get it done and over with! Wishing you all the best and success.

     

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    Matthew Dirksen

    Arman, I offer my sincere congratulations on your  pass, and for your long-term accomplishment!

    Fwiw: I think I still have a copy of my first IDP hours spreadsheet I created back in '94.... somewhere on an old Mac hard drive.

    So even though I took only ARE 5.0 exams, I took them all between 4/18-5/19, and subsequently got my MD License a month later.

    That means MOST of my career has primarily been about how to actually make "Getting Licensed" a priority in my life. Ultimately, the biggest thing for me was finding a firm which was not only willing and able to help me with signing off my hours, but was very supportive of the cause, and residing in a state which values experience at the same level as education.

    Fortunately for me, Maryland is one of 17 states which "Recognize additional experience as an alternate to the education requirement."

    Having earned my BS-Arch in '94 and my M-Arch back in '01 (from a small school in California which had never quite finished their NAAB accreditation process), I knew I was on a much longer road that the typical intern.

    But now that I'm done, I don't regret a thing about my path or the time it took. Here's a link to what I posted after my final exam. There's probably advice for everyone in there, but especially the older candidates. 

    I just wish more states offered alternatives to the "education requirement", because I believe there are probably many skilled and seasoned mid-career design professionals out there who might actually continue to pursue their license if they knew there was "a path for them". And especially if it didn't have to involve having to go back to school and incur $$$ in debt on a professional degree that "might" only have marginal applicable relevance compared to the full-time architectural job they currently have.

    Either way, it was a sweet, sweet day: watching my boss last June change my job title from "Senior Project Designer" to "Senior Project Architect" with the stroke of a pen.

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    Arman Bostani

    Thanks Mathew and likewise, congrats on your achievements.  Just read your very detailed and encouraging post. I totally agree that more states should allow candidates with experience and technical background to apply for license. After all, the testing standards established by NCARB and required by all jurisdictions is the same for everyone. I work in TX but sent off my application to home state of NY for initial registration (currently under CA jurisdiction).. so the journey continues, but hopefully get through with this in the near future. 

     

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