Why is that "A heavy rainstorm causes a delay in the schedule" is not the reason of a change order?

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5 comments

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    Katie Merten

    Normally, only weather above and beyond what is normal for the location for the time of year is a reason to change the schedule.  Say, if it snows in Houston--they would allow a schedule change because that is a very unusual event.  But if it snows in Minnesota, it wouldn't be a reason for a change, because it snows all the time and should be built into the schedule.  

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    Hongxi Yang

    hmm... so if it's more specific, something like "the unusual weather causes a delay in the schedule", it could be the reason of a change order?

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    Joel Edwards

    The type of weather that would change a schedule or require a change order would be categorized as an "Act of God". Insurance companies use this term to describe weather or events that happens outside the norm for a specific location or region.

    "An 'Act of God' is something that could not have been prevented or avoided, either by caution or preparation."

    https://www.thezebra.com/insurance-news/2475/acts-of-god-and-what-they-mean-for-your-auto-insurance/

    The Contractor could not have planned for or prevented the delay in construction due to an Act of God so it is only fair that they are compensated for the additional time added to the project schedule.

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    Katie Merten

    @Hongxi, yes, wording it would that way would likely result in a change order.  

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    Mollie Pelletier

    Normal weather should be accounted for in the construction schedule. Weather that is outside the normal could be put in a change order

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