Interior layout

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4 comments

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    Sofia Salvat Mere

    Architect Graphic Standards should have some info on this. I think the general idea is that the layout should be universal; so a person in a wheelchair should be able to comfortably enter the room, maneuver around it and situate themselves in the area.

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    David Kaplan

    Nayoung,

    Not sure you'll get this specific of a question on the PPD exam, I suppose it's possible though.  I would offer that with medical Waiting Rooms, I agree that maneuverability is very important as stated above, and wheelchair spaces need to be provided among the seats so they're not blocking aisleways. 

    The other important factor would be patient privacy.  This deals with locating and arranging the check-in/check-out desk so that no one is overhearing the conversation I have with the medical receptionist.  Often times you'll see dividing panels located at the reception desk, usually when there's multiple receptionists helping patients simultaneously.  You also want to keep the waiting area seating somewhat away from these desks so that people sitting there aren't hearing everything.  There's no "set way" to do it, as in no perfect dimension or setback distance.  You simply use common sense a bit when designing for this. 

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    Nayoung Kim

    Hi Sofia and David, thanks for the comment. Do you think locating chairs not to face directly each other would also help? or this is just too design oriented not related to this kind of question? If only wheelchair clearance is the most important factor, having nothing in the middle could be the most effective but I still can't think without designer's mind how that could be the right answer. I really hope Ncarb to remove all of the very vague questions. Very frustrating... 

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    David Kaplan

    Nayoung,

    No, I don't think locating chairs facing each other or not facing each other matters one way or the other.  And I truly believe as well that you won't get asked something like that (I didn't). 

    With respect to the "vague" questions you're expecting and perhaps feel you have experienced, MY personal experience is that I didn't think any of the 5.0 questions I got were vague.  I thought that on PA, PPD, and PDD, as long as you truly followed the criteria given to you in the question, there truly was only one right answer.  With these questions that deal directly with planning out a space, you're going to get 4 or 5 pieces of information that are requirements that must be met when planning the space.  I really did find the case to be that if you paid attention and followed each and every one of those, there was no vagueness. 

    Best I can offer to you is to really read the questions and the criteria given and make sure you have a solid understanding of what it is you have to do.  Be on the lookout as well for information given to you that is undoubtedly unrelated and meant to throw you off - I had multiple questions where criteria given was irrelevant and I was therefore able to ignore it.  Know going into these tests that this is INTENTIONAL on the ARE's part and meant to test you as the test-taker on your ability to figure that out.

     

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