Failure

Comments

25 comments

  • Avatar
    William May
    Divison 11.16 to 6.17 2017 2018
    Practice Management 47% 50% 51%
    Project Management 56% 59% 62%
    Programming & Analysis 53% 53% 53%
    Project Planning & Design 50% 50% 46%
    Project Development & Documentation 56% 56% 53%
    Construction & Evaluation 53% 61% 70%
    TOTALS FOR PASSING 53% 55% 56%
    Number of Candidates Testing 4,092 7,657

    15,493

    The average PASS/Fail is 56%.  There is no defending the premise that this is ok.  This is a miserable failure of a process that starts when a person enters a university until they graduate and work for a number of years going thru an apprentice process that culminates in a 56% PASS/FAIL situation.

    The average annual out-of-state cost for a bachelor program in Architecture is $47,699 with an estimated average four year degree total cost of $190,796.  So can you imagine, you are told that you will spend nearly $191,000 and when you go to sit for the ARE there is the likelihood you only have a 56% probability of passing.  You will be required to go thru an apprenticeship program that will probably only give you a 56% probability of passing the ARE.

    Does this only cause me concern?  Or are other people thinking what I'm voicing?

    And as for the test, I had no problem with the true/false, multiple choice, fill in blank questions.  But as for the case study questions, pure BS.  I'd be willing to bet that more than 70% of all sole practicing architects would fail those questions in a timed test. 

    I don't want to be an accountant in an architects firm.  If I want to know if I'm profitable any given quarter, I'll go look at the excel spread sheet and my checking account.  The questions pertained to offices that had at least 1 principal, 2 architects, 3 cad people and 3 non-design staff people.  Some of the 20 questions in the case studies were for offices that had between 20 to 50 people.  I'm never going to see either of those situations in the next 20 years!  Ludicrous!

    -1
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Hang Cho

    William -

    Thank you for your healthy criticism!

    FYI, I have been struggling to be a licensed architect for almost 20 years since 3.0 thru 4.0 and now 5.0 and now I am a father of 3 teenage kids. There was a time in the past when I really gave up for a year because I had to retake all 7 exams again after 5 years rolling clock period ends. In the end, I just can not ignore the inner voice(?) saying "continue & keep going". I passed  during ARE 4.0 and again ... I have to retake all but CE. but I really want to finish this year with you guys.

    I believe you are a lot younger, smarter & stronger than me so You will finish much sooner with excellent score - Good luck !!!

     

     

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    William May

    Hang,

    I turn 62 in May.  I completed 13 years of work in multiple architectural and engineering firms and then got into Vocational Education.  I took and passed the NOCTI - National Occupational Competency Testing Institute for Architectural, Mechanical and CAD for pre-certification requirements for teaching.  I taught for 10 years and completed the Vocational 1 level certification thru Indiana University of Pennsylvania.  I have earned the Real Estate Licensure certification and was an agent for 4 years.  I have 19 years experience since 2000 in architectural firms and my own residential design/drafting service since 2003.  I have found it necessary to become licensed because I am finding that due to my age, firms are not willing to hire me.  I have been told by principal architects that I was too old to hire.  Both times, it was over the phone.  I have collaborated on a variety of commercial project types.  I function as an architect but do not call myself an architect.  I negotiate services, produce projects, and maintain an office.  My capture rate is roughly 80% - I sign agreements with 8 out of 10 customers who I meet.  This is not me bragging, just straight factual information.  Frankly, I don't need the ARE to tell me if I am meeting the burden of proof to provide services to the public.  My projects meet code review and earn building permits for my clients.  I pass the test every time my clients walk in my door and eventually build using my instruments of service. 

    Good luck - I'm sure we'll talk again.

    wdm

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Kurt Fanderclai

    William,

    You're not likely to care what I post, but others may find some benefit.  

    Saw a couple of your posts pop up -- I'm never happy to see anyone fail.

    Sometimes a reality check is what's needed.  For starters, take a hard look at how you really must have performed on the exam.  For example, you say you "had no problem with the true/false, multiple choice, fill in blank questions".  This can't actually be true, or you still would have passed.  Not looking to beat you up about this, but you need to look at the exam and your performance 100% objectively.      

    If you decide to become open to some constructive criticism, this forum has become a big repository of information and descriptions of successful exam-prep strategies.  I think a very large proportion of those who've failed exams have chosen a path different from taking full advantage of this advice. 

    I've noticed that almost none of your posts have to do with you pursuing any of these best-known paths to ARE success.  You've instead posted your opinions and criticisms of:  the form and content of the ARE 5.0 exam itself, the state of architectural education at large, NCARB as an organization, and even the way this forum is moderated.  You've also then gone on to continuously enumerate your own experience, qualifications and skill set.  You've also spent a lot of time and effort trying to make the case that the ARE covers topics you will personally never need within the bandwidth of your own specific employment. 

    Here's where my advice shows up:  You will need to come to terms with the fact that the ARE 5.0 does not care about any of that.  The exam is the exam -- period.  It's the exact same group of exan versions for all candidates, regardless of education or experience.  You'll need to realize that 100 percent of your time spent raging against the machine has amounted to 100 percent wasted time -- the same obstacle still remains. 

    For example, instead of discounting of the "actual" importance of "accounting" questions as you've done, you should instead note that Resource Management, etc., is noted as fair game for the exam -- right there in the 5.0 Handbook.  You feel this info is unnecessary, and yet there it is on the exam -- somehow regardless of your opinions.  So, then, stop arguing about it, stop discounting it -- and study it.   Learn it.  There is no other choice for those wishing to pass.    

    Focus is key.  Focus on the actual exam at hand.  Start with the Handbook -- read it.  Buy the recommended "Top Resources".  Do you need more than the Top Resources?  Maybe -- so buy those as well.  Learn the Handbook practice questions. Study consistently every day for 4 - 6 weeks (per non-scientific consensus) for a given exam.  Ask questions on the forum every couple of days on topics you don't understand.  Build and improve your knowledge base -- a side benefit is that ARE exam prep will inevitably expand a given candidate's overall understanging of the profession.

    Everyone has personal crtiticisms and opinions, and they can be pretty fun to express.  However -- and I think this part is going to be huge for you -- you need to accept that your own personal opinions, perceptions and experiences have nothing to do with passing the exams.  The ARE does not care.

    Reboot your approach.  You'll need to implement "William 2.0".  Good luck moving forward.

    6
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    William May

    Kurt,

    You make good points.  You had me right up to the word BUY.  Buy More!  Yes, go buy more because what I've already purchased in the way of education and giving former employers in the way of free work to them ain't makin the cut.  And as far as "the exam is the exam" - that can change, has changed and should change - it ain't makin it either.

    Here's a problem.  I have studied, long.  I've also practiced, long.  But now that I have taken the test and failed, I don't know what I don't know.  And you are right - Focus IS key.  But I can't focus because I don't know what the focus should be.  I can't ask questions in the forum because I don't know what I missed on the test!  I don't know what to study, because I don't know what I missed.  I'm not going to buy because I don't know what is worth buying because I DON'T KNOW WHAT I MISSED!

    BUY? WTF! Do I need more than the Top Resources, maybe?!  Really, that's your solution?  Buy more and study more and Then maybe you'll know everything you need to know.  Hey, gee, if that were true, everyone should only need to take the test once because if they Are reading these posts it should be apparent that you nailed the answer to passing - buy more, study more and voila, you will pass.

    For all you folks who don't pass, buy more, study longer and you too will pass the ARE.

    -2
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Kurt Fanderclai

    Minus the hyperbole, and for others reading this thread, if there really is any confusion about my previous post regarding study materials:

    Every candidate will need to determine which study materials they will ultimately require.  For many -- most? -- the "Top Resources" straight from the 5.0 handbook provide a reasonable and adequate base from which to take the exams.   

    However, it's only reasonable to point out that -- depending up a candidate's familiarity / unfamiliarity with a given topic -- additional study sources may sometimes be required in order for that candidate to adequately understand an unfamiliar topic.  So, it is certainly possible that a given candidate may need to acquire -- yes, possibly even purchase -- additional materials. 

    This is not news.  There is no magic potion.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    William:

    Your response regressed almost immediately back into your standard line of impertinence.  

    ".... because what I've already purchased in the way of education and giving former employers in the way of free work to them ain't makin the cut."

    See my previous post.  Again, while your education and work experience are important to you personally, the ARE DOES.  NOT. CARE.  Period.  So, whatever frustrations you are currently feeling, you are still railing against objective reality.  Like any other candidate, you will need to honestly assess your current understanding of the topics at hand, and -- if your goal is to pass -- do whatever is additionally necessary.

    There are quite a few accounts on this forum of candidates putting in monumental efforts over long periods of time in order to pass.  Do you really think your background and efforts are so unique as to place you in some other category?  Wow.  They sure aren't.  

    Also:

    '....And as far as "the exam is the exam" - that can change, has changed and should change - it ain't makin it either.".....'

    Versions of the ARE do change periodically.  But, are you seriously expecting the current 5.0 version -- which you are now taking -- to change according to your preferences?  That is simply not going to happen -- it's a completely irrational expectation.   For all practical purposes, the exam is the exam -- the content, the format -- all of it.  This fully applies to you and to anyone else currently taking the ARE -- 100% regardless of your opinions.

    I can't stop you from making posts like you've been making,and are still continuing to make, since you do seem quite happy with yourself when you post them.  But let me ask you this -- are you enjoying posting them more than passing exams?

    Lots of totally wasted time on your part.

    Should you choose to move forward -- there are numerous smart folks on this forum who have successfully completed the ARE and have stuck around to help out other candidates -- and they would certainly still help you out.  But, in all seriousness, you are going to need to drop the attitude, ask them for help, and do the work

    Good luck.

    5
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Michael Lawson

    Well said Kurt, I've been following the subject as well and wasn't sure how to put into words what you've said. I feel fortunate for passing, but at the same time I know it was not down to luck. Yes the pass rate is around that 50% mark, but luck does not determine what content is on the test. I studied the Handbook so much that I almost had it memorized, and I knew exactly the subjects I was going to be tested on. They lay it out for us right there in plain text. From there, I had to work hard to pass the test. Along the way I picked up information that will help me be a better architect, but I primarily studied for the test.

    The way they ask questions and deal with subjects is clearly not the same as the real world, so you have to put the real world to the side, sometimes even including your experience. I do not believe they are testing your abilities as a practitioner of architecture, but your abilities as an architect, in their own definition of that. 

    I do wish you the best of luck William, but I mostly hope you find the path that works for you. Failing one test isn't the end of the road - I've heard of people failing one test a dozen times (still not the end of the road). 

    2
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    David Kaplan

    William,

    I was going to recommend as well that, given the many years you have preparing drawings and running full projects, you might consider switching gears and going after PPD and/or PDD instead.  You might find those exams a bit more in your current wheelhouse because they really deal with the process of producing a project from the SD phase through CD's completion, and from what I can tell you have lots of experience in that.  I've seen others on this forum suggest this approach as well. 

    Point being, it would be nice to get a win under your belt because doing so would help you refocus on the other parts of this entire process that are causing the frustration.  I would say to figure out which exam sounds the most to you like one you know the most about and go sign up for that one.  Maybe that would help?

    2
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    William May

    Kurt,

    I actually do read your comments and weigh the content.  But that doesn’t mean I am required to accept the comments.

    The reason the ARE 5.0 exists is that the 4 before it were not acceptable to candidates who took them and said that they did not work.  I am doing exactly that which has brought about change prior to the 5.0.

    Look at the change from IDP to AXP.  My opinion is that when they dropped hours off of the IDP that I went thru from 5,600 to the now AXP of 3,740 – a loss of 1,860 hours it was done because people couldn’t find jobs in architect offices.  To drop hours is a real contradiction – those hours give people the time to gain experience to understand the 6 divisions of the ARE.  They made it easier to fulfil a requirement.  But they made it harder to learn what real world practice is.  The ARE has a division that is the epitome of what the test evaluates How to run an office.  But what was done? They deleted hours.  NCARB should have RAISED the number of hours or kept the hours not drop them.

    And to address your comment about what the ARE cares about or doesn’t care about – sure it cares.  It cares a lot, that’s why we ARE doing case studies and NOT doing vignettes with some goofy cad program that was a joke.  It DOES care, why do you think we are not still doing paper tests and making drawings on vellum or tracing paper.  Sorry, but the ARE does care, it is just driven by the wrong people for the wrong reasons.

    And yes, there are numerous smart people who have stuck around and I thank and applaud them.  But, when they tell me to go buy more study materials AND study more AND to focus on my errors so that I can come back stronger – they couldn’t be more wrong.  You, nor anyone on any of the forums has any idea how long I study.  And what I study – buy more?

    This test is flawed.  The pass rate is a dismal 56%.  It doesn’t prove what I know for me to be able to serve the public – I and others like me are serving the public.  We unlicensed professionals ARE protecting the health, welfare and safety of the public – not because of the ARE but we follow codes and do know how to run an office and projects and because we do know how building are constructed.  We know how to analyze, program, plan, design, document and evaluate.  The test is flawed because a candidate isn’t able to know what they don’t know to get better.  Tests evaluate what we know and what we need to learn.  The test is flawed because when people who have studied and have college degrees and bought more and studied more STILL fail not once or twice but many times it’s because the test process and content is flawed.  No test that is failing 44% of the candidates is a good test. 

    I can’t access my current understanding because the test results don’t tell me what I got wrong.  How are the smart people going to help me, they don’t know what I know or what I don’t know.  They don’t know what questions I missed or got right.  Gee, take more tests that I only have a 56% chance to pass and pay each time and have no idea what I get wrong?  Hey public would you want someone who has no idea why they failed the test 3 times but passed on the 4th try to design your building or someone that passed on their 1st time?  Oh wait, the public doesn’t know you failed 3 times before you passed on the 4th try. 

    Last year I did 31 projects – 11 additions, 8 finished basements, 7 new homes, 3 garages and 2 barns.  The projects covered 4 counties.  All projects went thru zoning and code reviews.  They all got permitted.  I billed just over 1,300 hours.  I’m not bragging.  I’m saying that I know how to practice architecture.  The test isn’t checking my ability to offer services to the public – it’s simply preventing me from using a title.  It’s not checking my ability to collaborate with a licensed architect to do commercial projects – it’s preventing me from using a title and competing with other designers.  Would I do something different if I do get licensed, nope.  Will the test guarantee the public I won’t make an error or omission, nope.

    Failing a dozen times, really, does that seem wrong on more than one level to anyone else besides me?  

    Again I throw the challenge – every 5 years a licensed architect must retake the ARE.  Besides, I like my attitude.   

    -1
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Kurt Fanderclai

    William, 

    I've over-commented already.  Note that I and others would rather see you succeed. 

    But as I've noted, I have no idea what you're hoping to accomplish with these sorts of posts.  Your pattern of response tends toward intentional misrepresentation of essentially everything anyone offers.  Which, isn't going to help you as you attempt to pass the exams.      

    For example, I've explained -- twice now -- that some candidates may need to supplement their list of materials for weak areas.  This can be done by borrowing more study materials.  Or, if none are avialable to be borrowed -- then, yes, they may need to buy the specific, necessary supplemental study materials.   This would seem to be a very basic concept.  Yet you've continued to attempt a reframing of this advice to the point of nonsense.  Has anyone on this forum ever suggested randomly and thoughtlessly purchasing endless additional materials as a means to success?  Do you honestly believe that is my advice?  Or anyone else's?  You're accomplishing nothing by purposefully misrepresenting normal conversation.

    Also -- as for my comment that, for the purposes of passing the ARE 5.0, the ARE does not care...  Note carefully what I actually said -- the ARE does not care.  No one said the exams never change, or that NCARB itself doesn't care.  Rather than twist yourself in knots attempting a pointless attempt to prove I'm wrong, you might instead consider why I might have made this statement to you.  It's a way of telling you that you need to focus on the business at hand.  You don't need to regard yourself as the agent of change for the betterment of the ARE -- that will take care of itself over time -- always has.  What you DO need to do is to pass 5.0.  Unless you plan you wait for 6.0, and you also somehow believe that the future 6.0 will be improved via your current commentary to better suit your own personal needs, then you are wasting a lot of time.   You are currently taking 5.0, which, is obviously already written, and so it is blind to your opinions.  So, again, for your purposes -- you should regard the ARE 5.0 as something that just IS...  It's already in place, and is not itself going to change.  5.0 is an already existing obstacle you need to overcome, and it certainly does not care about your opinions.  Everyone has such opinions, but most candidates don't let their own opinions disrupt their practical exam efforts.

    In other words, take the exam or don't take it.  If I take you at your word, you believe that ARE is 100% useless, that it's a hopelessly flawed exam, that is tests the wrong information, that it offers no real standard related to public protection, and that the exam is passed only by sheer luck.  If this is your honest opinion, then it makes little sense for you to continue any further with the ARE.

    "I can’t access my current understanding because the test results don’t tell me what I got wrong.  How are the smart people going to help me, they don’t know what I know or what I don’t know.  They don’t know what questions I missed or got right."

    Short of reporting specific questions, you do receive performance feedback from NCARB per exam section.  Weak areas are knoweable.  So, the "smart people" can help you, but you'll need to start by actually asking them substantive questions.    

    I think you need to reboot your efforts.  Step One is less editorializing.  You're right that no one here knows how much you studied, what materials you used, etc.  But everyone certainly know your personal opinions of the ARE, your thoughts on NCARB, and how many project you did last year.     

    3
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Kenneth Barrett

    William,

    I'm not big on defending NCARB or the ARE exams, but I can say with first hand knowledge that an architect's career can take so many varied forms and specialties that designing a series of tests that accurately reflect that reality and assess an candidates suitability is...really damn hard.

    Your work experience is very different from mine in metropolitan NYC.

    Having started in ARE 4.0,transitioned, and completed 5.0, I believe the exams are much improved.

    As for buying more study materials, I found the free 4.0 exam guides really helpful.

     

    Here's a post with my post exam run-down of what to know on PDD which may also help with PPD:

    https://are5community.ncarb.org/hc/en-us/community/posts/360021711513-PDD-Mission-Impossible-

     

    And here's a post with links to all of the 4.0 exam guides and the transition calculator:

    https://are5community.ncarb.org/hc/en-us/community/posts/360025916654-HELP-Thinking-about-quitting-the-ARE

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Julie Brown

    Kurt's right. He's administering a little tough love right now, but William's attitude towards these exams needs to embrace them as they are. While this is technically a forum for discussing the ARE 5.0 exams (in none too specific detail), the intention of the forum is to provide support to everyone who is currently testing or planning to take the ARE. It is not meant to be used to promote personal agendas. So if your goal is to rail against the "flawed" tests until NCARB tailors them to the experience of one east-coast guy who does single-family homes, additions, and barns.... please consider that the negativity is NOT helping anyone else here who's seeking support, guidance, or encouragement that the forum was created for. You CAN pass these exams. Your fail report tells you the areas where you need improvement. The handbook tells you the resources to which each area is relevant. If you read those resources and understand the principles and can apply that information to evaluate a range of problems, you'll do good. I'm glad NCARB sets a standard for licensure with an exam format that addresses the ability to understand/evaluate and at a scale that is much larger than what may be the most common architecture firm's much-smaller breadth of experience. Otherwise, NCARB might be handing licenses to a person ill-equipped to protect the life safety, health, and welfare of users of essential service buildings, schools, office buildings, and civic-scale architecture.

    I started studying in earnest for PcM twenty-four hours before I took the exam. I passed. I've not run a firm, or pestered my employers to show me their books or grill their accountants. This does not make me "lucky". I studied the AHPP, applied that information in conjunction with what my work experience HAS provided me, and made sure I took time in the exam to read the questions carefully and with the intent to understand what was being asked. I also didn't go into the exam expecting to fail and ready to be indignant about it. Do I feel equipped to run a firm now? No. But that is not the point of this exam, believe it or not.

    Also, let go of the pass/fail rate. The exam's pass/fail rate is not your chances of passing or failing this division. This is not roulette. Your attitude and your actions have the ability to influence your outcome. Let the people who are rooting for you to succeed help you align your attitude and actions for the best possible outcome.

     

    2
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    William May

    How do I find out what I did not correctly answer on the PcM?

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    William May

    This tells me vaguely that I didn't pass.  It doesn't help because I have no way to see specific questions and correct answers.  I'm not really seeing the benefit of the levels.  It's a pass-fail.  Without specific Q&A data I'm spending time studying without and specific focus.  I have no way to see what I know and what I don't know.  I'm spinning my wheels.

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Julie Brown

    You don't get to find out specifically what questions were incorrectly answered on the exam, but you should receive an Score Report, and there's a good post by NCARB on how to use that report's information to gain insight on your performance.

    https://are5community.ncarb.org/hc/en-us/articles/115006151687-How-to-Read-an-ARE-5-0-Score-Report

    I failed the PDD exam. In reviewing my Score Report, I was *shocked* that the areas that were Level 3 ("not meeting the minimal competency" in three subject areas) were areas where I felt the most confident in leaning on my work experience. The other two areas were Level 2. No stellar Level 1's achieved. But I didn't wallow in my "less than competent" areas convinced that my current knowledge level SHOULD have been enough to be competent just because in real life I've gotten a plan checker to release a permit on my work results. I went back to my study resources and read in more detail anything on those Level 3 topics, and double-checked the objectives listed in the Handbook. I lightly brushed up on the Level 2 categories.

    Whenever I would leave an exam with a feeling like I'd been surprised by particular content, or not confident that I KNEW the information a handful of questions were about, I would jot those topics down and make a mental note once out of the exam to do a better job on understanding those things. You know when you read a question and you're like, "hmmmm, could be two of these answers..." or "yikes, I don't know about THIS stuff!" or "okay, like I remember reading about this, but dammit, which one was negative..." Those are the things I would immediately go look up once I was out, just in case I had just failed. And frankly because I wanted to learn about those fuzzy areas and have clarity.

    Without seeing your Score Report, if you had a smattering of Level 2s and 3s, you may have just been a few questions shy of passing, in which case, you just need to brush up on those questions whose topics caught you off-guard.

    Good luck.

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    William May

    see above, 3 level 3's 1 level 4

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    William May

    The problem that I have is one that a lot of people have, lack of time.  The reason is that i thought I had a good bead on the information. 

    Here's my take away.  I failed like many other people failed.  But, I don't have a 5 year degree either.  If I did have a 5 year degree to the tune of $150,000 I'd Really be ticked off.  I'm thinking that a 5 year degree doesn't seem to help to prepare someone to pass the test.

    I'll eventually pass.  I earned my teaching certificate and taught for 10 years.  I earned my Real Estate License and was a million dollar producer 3 out of 4 years before the crash.  I'll earn licensure eventually.  I just think that the process is flawed.  Other than people saying to buy more study materials and study more, no one can really help me to focus on what I don't know.  When someone said that they knew of people who failed the same test a dozen times, that tells me something is wrong.

     

    -1
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    William May

    I personally learn by spatial and kinesthetic methods.  I learn by doing.  I can read something a thousand times but until see questions and answers it doesn't sink in.  Until I'm doing something in practice, it doesn't sink in.  Practice questions help me validate what I think I know and the feedback helps me understand what I don't know.  It's not memorization, it's learning by doing. 

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Julie Brown

    Sorry, my last post crossed paths with yours in the interwebs.

    Resist the temptation to slip back into your negative headspace! Look forward and strategize, don't look backward and prop yourself up with excuses. Yes, identify your weaknesses, but then tackle them. On to strategy:

    So, based on your Score Report, Content Area 2 should be your biggest focus as you outline your next study strategy. It's your Level 4 category, and it also happens to be the biggest percentage of the exam questions, so you'll benefit most greatly from improving this knowledge area. If the exam is still fresh in your mind, jot down an outline of any topics that caught you off-guard, or keywords that snagged your understanding, or weren't familiar.

    Your primary resource should be the Architect's Handbook of Professional Practice (AHPP). I personally used an outdated version that my coworker had (I think it might have been 14th Edition, but possibly older?). It's probably best to access the current version (15th ed), but in terms of new evolution in the "Architecture Firm", BIM technology is the most drastic development and that's not going to be impactful in the content areas of risk, legal exposures, and resolutions, financial well-being of the practice, structure of the practice, partnering with other firms to get/do work from a legal standpoint, workplace environment governances, etc. Technology is just a little piece of a project delivery approach and plays into schedules and budgets. It's dry reading, but it's digestible. Avoid the temptation to disagree with the book because "that's not what my old boss did". (NCARB did not hire anybody's old boss to write ARE questions based on that guy's personal experience.) I also studied the AIA Contracts B101-2017 and C401-2017. Per the ARE 5.0 Handbook, also read:

    Model Rules of Conduct - NCARB: https://www.ncarb.org/sites/default/files/Rules_of_Conduct.pdf It's short.

    I also had access to Ballast 4.0 study materials for all divisions. Using the 4.0 conversion chart I checked what 4.0 divisions are now distributed into 5.0 divisions, and I read the pertinent material from the 4.0 study guides. For example: Practice Management is made up of {content that meets the ARE 5.0 Handbook objectives} from 4.0 "Construction Documents and Services" and "Programming Planning and Practice" divisions.

    As Kurt cautioned though, what works for one person may not be sufficient for another person. As a former educator, you've obviously seen this in your past students. It's good that you know how you learn. Some retain information when shown specific examples (I'm like that, but I've seen a LOT of specific examples in my work exposure), some people are audio-learners, they need to hear it to retain it, some people benefit from practicing, some people need repetition. Some people need to step back from the content and first understand how to break down an exam question's structure and hone in on the essential "who/what/why" that the question is looking for. Even thought the 4.0 Ballast materials were not presented in total alignment with the improvements of the 5.0 format, I benefited from the practice questions --not so much to quiz myself on content, but to ...practice... questions. To get comfortable with concentrating, digesting information, paying attention to sentence structure, sorting out extraneous information, and being conscious of key words like "not" or "best" or "most" or "least". Skimming over a little word like "not" when the question is something like "which approach is NOT correct?" obviously makes a huge impact on how you evaluate the possible answers in a multiple choice format.

    Also, if you're reading something (in your study materials, not exam-specific content!) and you can't visualize an example of where that scenario would apply because you haven't "done" that thing before, pose the question to the forum, open-ended. Or ask a colleague or coworker or boss. That's one way to "learn by doing" when your normal work environment doesn't provide you that specific opportunity.

     

    1
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Hang Cho

    William -

    I took PcM & got 3-lvl 3, 1-lvl 2 & schedule to retake 5/28 right after PjM 5/25.

    I will spend to study PcM during April & PjM May.

    I believe - with all your precious & depth of knowlege & experience you have - you are very near to passing line & will pass next time if you just keep study & even bit deep into PjM area with little intensity for Section 2 of PcM.

    Keep in touch !!!😃😁👌

     

    1
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Hang Cho (Edited )

    Here is very good link I found out & hope it help unless you already read !!!

    https://are5community.ncarb.org/hc/en-us/community/posts/360015375454-HALF-WAY-THERE-Passed-PjM-PcM-CE

     

    https://are5community.ncarb.org/hc/en-us/community/posts/360020464653

    I read this as often as I can as a guide with daily checking of ARE 5.0 community.

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Kurt Fanderclai

    "Here's my take away.  I failed like many other people failed.  But, I don't have a 5 year degree either.  If I did have a 5 year degree to the tune of $150,000 I'd Really be ticked off.  I'm thinking that a 5 year degree doesn't seem to help to prepare someone to pass the test.

    I'll eventually pass.  I earned my teaching certificate and taught for 10 years.  I earned my Real Estate License and was a million dollar producer 3 out of 4 years before the crash.  I'll earn licensure eventually.  I just think that the process is flawed.  Other than people saying to buy more study materials and study more, no one can really help me to focus on what I don't know.  When someone said that they knew of people who failed the same test a dozen times, that tells me something is wrong."

    I love to see people pass exams, and passing the entire ARE is a crazy great feeiling, I don't care who you are or what you background might be.

    I 've enjoyed trying to help others on this forum when I can -- for whatever that help has been worth to others.  And, I really  appreciated the help and collaboration of the forum members I received when I took the exams very early in 5.0.  I've since also really enjoyed seeing a growing group of ARE "veterans" continuing to offer help to others as they take on this challenge.  It's a great pattern -- everyone comes to the ARE "cold", unsure what to expect...  questions are asked and answered....  "I don't understand this part --oh, ok, thanks, now I get it"......advice is given:  try this, probably don't do that... etc.   For the majority of candidates, it's a great resource toward eventual success.  It's a tough test, and it defintiely requires a willing and open attitude.   

    The OP's above quote represents the other end of the spectrum.  For the many who've attempted to help, the OP's "take away" is a good thing to carefully note. The "take away" is an unchanged recap of the OP's position and outlook -- 100% identical to all of the OP's postings.   

    Sometimes, despite the efforts of the many, despite all evidence to the contrary, despite all presented logic and reason, and despite the failure of their own methods, some individuals choose to remain stubbornly and completely convinced of themselves and their own ineffective approach.

    Good luck to all.

     

     

    2
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Peter Mall

    Good luck Hang, you can do it! Focus on the areas you need to improve in as described by Julie above. After passing PcM this month I am on to PjM in April.

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Hang Cho

    Thank you, Peter !!!

    1
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Gustavo Diez-Presilla

    Fascinating argument both sides. For me coming from another country and a different day/night 17 years of experience; ARE has been a tough journey right from the start and yet while at the very beginning I saw the questions as tricky an deceptive now the y make more sense to me the fact the they do obligate you to think things really through. My native language is Spanish, I came from Cuba, they use back they the international metric system the one I used for 17 years which in my humble opinion is better than the imperial system but anyway. I have been working in a professional architectural for more than 6 years since as came in 2007 with the ups and downs of the free market society, I completed my IDP, I also war required to complete 3 credits of English Writing and Composition in order to validate my Diploma from Cuba. I took my first exam in 2017, CE, I failed and three months later I tried PCM and failed again, then 10 months later I retake CM and I failed again, Last March first I took CM for third time and I passed and it was overwhelming. My thoughts; I I though at the beginning that the barrier language was taking its toll even when in 12 years living in this country I never watch spanish TV or Read in spanish or even listen spanish music, only classic and jazz, ad i did that since I was a teenager back in Cuba, but still not my first language. The looking you guys struggling the same I understood it was not about language. I know that even when there is an standard in the general practice each office choose to have its own ways of do things and they may differs a lot from what you would find on the ARE question, there it goes real experience not helping. Using only one source of information, not good either. This process is to me more like a training than an studying process and there it goes the need of repetition, ( designers hacks is very good for that) And finally but not less important, common sense coming from the professional experience. Even when ARE could look useless and away from reality it is not the case, I now know that for sure. So, separate your self from disappointment and open your mind and you will find the way. And preparing now for retake PCM again and I am taking my timer to hammer everything over, and over, and over, good luck to everyone 

    0
    Comment actions Permalink

Please sign in to leave a comment.

Powered by Zendesk