NCARB Rules of Conduct

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    Joshua Huggins

    That should be it. It's a just a pretty basic set of guidelines. What topic for "this or that" is it talking about that doesn't seem covered?

    https://www.ncarb.org/sites/default/files/Rules_of_Conduct.pdf 

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    Kellie Locke (Edited )

    One pertains to signing and sealing documents under an architect's "responsible control:" There is an a practice exam answer that cites "special provisions" that apply when drafting work is done by a person not regularly employed in the architect's office, saying these provisions say documentation of the drafter's involvement must be retained for 5 years. Rule 5 covers signing and sealing documents, but they are pretty brief with no such special provisions. 

    Another says the Rules of Conduct are explicit about obtaining proper permissions and honoring copyright, which is of course important, but not referenced in the NCARB Model Rules of Conduct that I am reading. Rule 4.3 states that an architect shall comply with licensing laws, but I would hardly call that explicit regarding the scope of this question. 

    The Model Rules of Conduct have been updated July 2018, and this was before I was studying, so maybe the update is significantly different than what the book is referencing. I'm just wondering if there's more I need to know about the Rules of Conduct than what I'm seeing in the linked document.

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    Desiree Geib

    Hello Kellie,

    I think the 'special provisions' may have to do with contracting out work from the office or teaming up with another architecture firm. I haven't found anything specifically relating to these options and the Rules of Conduct, but Section 5.7 Small Firm Collaboration in AHPP discusses the many ways that firms may collaborate with each other. Either contracting out work or forming a joint venture of some kind.

    I think with contracting out work the scope of work and design is already defined to send to the independent contractor or company to follow, and I imagine the architect responsible would still closely review the work.

    In the situation where it is some kind of joint venture or collaboration, the agreement between the firms will delineate which parts of the project they are responsible for.

    Another side note, I think there are both the NCARB Rules of Conduct and the AIA Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct, so maybe they reference one sometimes, and another other times?

     

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