study question re: wood grain

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    Scott Barber

    Did they provide any other details in the question, clarifying what they meant by a "wood connector"? If you're nailing or bolting wood together, then perpendicular to the grain would be more efficient. If you're using nail plates for a wood truss or a hanger, it would be parallel to the grain. 

    What source was the practice exam from? Ballast still has inaccuracies (though the most recent printing corrected most of the issues in the first round of 5.0 content), and I'd imagine any third party source could be vulnerable to mistakes. I appreciated Designer Hacks and other practice questions that had an explanation of the answer. Did the practice exam explain the reasoning behind what they said was the correct answer?

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    Anton Gross

    This was from Black Spectacles. Nothing more was given. I have been using designer hacks as well for more questions, but they seem to be a bit simple compared to Black Spectacles. BS test is a great 4 hr test with great Case Studies for getting used to handling the volume of questions as well as the formats of questions and the case studies specifically, referencing the documents, etc.

    I just wanted to understand wood grain and connections, etc. I don't use wood framing much so I'm a bit green with all that. no pun intended.

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    Scott Barber

    Gotcha - yeah Designer Hacks isn't a comprehensive exam simulation, I just liked the ease of quizzing myself when I had a few minutes to break up my studying and stay fresh, and their answer explanations were beneficial too. 

    Black Spectacles has other content too, correct? I'd reference their videos or study material and see if they go into depth there. Typically, the 3rd party practice exams test on their own content, so I would think they provide an explanation there.
    Not sure what you've studied already but Architectural Graphics Standards would be an excellent source to look at if you can get it. Building Construction Illustrated was also good, but the details in AGS would be a great resource for you if you're inexperienced with wood construction.

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    Anson Nickel

    I recall seeing that question, and I too was tripped up by the wording. I think the question was getting at which orientation of the wood is actually stronger (parallel is stronger than perpendicular).

    See a powerpoint cut from a woodworks,org presentation. 

     

    http://www.woodworks.org/wp-content/uploads/C-WSF-2012-Hereford-SW2W.pdf

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    Jorge De La Rosa

    this below is not a helpful tip, just me wondering out loud based on previous experience:

    funny thing to me is, based on that slide, which matches perfectly with what I read last night in the PPI Chapter 25 (Wood Const.); however, if you nail something parallel to the grain, the wood piece may split in two. this is me talking from when I used to work remodeling houses and not exactly with rough carpentry members, but with finish carpentry elements...of course, structurally/load bearing-wise, parallel to the grain the member is in fact stronger.

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    Anson Nickel

    Absolutely. You'll notice that the fastener is located and installed in the same location. The only difference is the orientation of the wood member itself. 

    In the end, I think the question was just a silly and jarbled way of getting to the parallel/perpendicular LOADING distinction as it relates to the fastener, not necessarily the distinction of para/perp grain...

     

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    Anton Gross

    Anson, thanks for the clarification and resource to learn even more about wood in general. Thanks again.

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