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    Edward Brown

    Hi Monica - Yes there will be some structures questions on the PDD exam. Most importantly, take a look around the PDD section of this board especially any posts that are regarding "Passed PDD". The general consensus is that 3rd party materials (such as Brightwood/Ballast/etc.) are not sufficient as stand alone exam prep material.

    Best,

    Ned

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    Monica Perez Del Rio

    Thanks Ned!

    Monica.

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    Kelvin Haywood

    Hi Monica, you will need a number of resources. You should def pick up Building Construction Illustrated, Ballast. This has some of the 4.0 BS, SS, BDCS, so it is a broad test. I did not pass the 1st time and preparing to retake. I am now on my 3rd take. SO we'll se how it goes. I also did Amber book, I heard a lot about them, and lots of youtube videos. Praying for a PASS this time around. SO from some one who has taken it a few times already. Study a broad width of material, and it still m ight not seem like its enough but at least you will feel prepared. Hope you PASS on the first try.  

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    David Kaplan

    Monica,

    Three sources I used for structural systems review:

    1) Architect's Studio Companion - this has a very good overview of structural systems, when to use concrete vs. steel, which might be more economical, etc.

    2) Ballast Structural Systems for the old 4.0 exam - I had an old 2010 version of this book lying around in the office.  I used it solely to study concepts.  How do beams react and deflect under certain loading conditions?  Where is the tension side of a concrete beam and where should the rebar go?  Things like that.  Focus on concepts - NOT FORMULAS.  The only formulas I went into this exam knowing were how to calculate the moment about point A when a beam is loaded with perhaps a point load and a uniform load.  I literally ignored all the detailed calculations in that book.  That is not an exaggeration.  This book also covers wind and seismic design concepts very well.

    3) FEMA Earthquake Manual Chapters 4 and 5 - a great resource for seismic design.  Goes over strategies that architects can use to lay out the structure of a building to resist seismic loads.  Also covers typical damages caused by earthquakes.  I highly recommend this book.  A definite for PPD as well.

    I can't stress enough - don't memorize formulas and don't get hung up on them.  Doing so will yield very little return on investment.  Spend your time studying building wall section details for PDD. 

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    Jonathan Chertok (Edited )

    yeah, it would be great if the "objectives" weren't so anodyne while at the same time being so all-encompassing. the section in PDD related to structural states:

    "1.3 determine the size of structural systems to meet project goals
    - you will need to be able to identify and develop structural systems, including calculating the size of some structural components based on the system type, system requirements, programmatic requirements, and other factors."

    - - - which is basically useless.

    off the top of my head i would say - be very familiar with MOMENT DIAGRAMS (for instance continuous loads have a /linear/ moment diagram and point loads have a /curved moment diagram) and SHEAR DIAGRAMS (know that orthogonal - think rectangles - shear diagrams imply linear moment diagrams and /linear/ shear diagrams - as in linear slopes - imply curved moment diagrams). anyway, i think that is right.

    what else? FEMA is useful. know the various ways buildings gain torsional stability.

    personally i would work through some moment reaction equations. it will also help you get your head into moment and shear diagrams again.

    also, there is one chart in IBC related to loads that would be useful reviewing. off the top of my head it is in the 1000's range.

    i'd also crank through AISC and make sure you can read structural member sizing and variables. i personally would also work section modulus and moment of inertia equations. unfortunately the "references available when testing" have inexplicably been stripped of their /variables/ (apparently to simplify them?!) so they are almost unrecognizable from anything you might try to remember of even find somewhere.

    for materials they list "minimum design loads for buildings and other structures (7-10) (american society of civil engineers)" as a PRIMARY REFERENCE (which is like a bad joke so don't buy it you will only have to return it). but if you compare the near useless /depth/ of this book against the indecipherable "objectives" on this topic it does a good job of illustrating a problem they seem to have with helping you prepare for the exam.  

    HTH

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    PROJECT DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN "SECTIONS"

    section 1: integration of building materials and systems (35%)
    section 2: construction documentation (35%)
    section 3: project manual and specifications (15%)
    section 4: codes and regulations (10%)
    section 5: construction cost estimates (5%)


    PROJECT DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN "OBJECTIVES"

    integration of building materials and systems

    1.1 analyze the integration of architectural systems and technologies to meet project goals
    - as an architect you will first need to be able to resolve and detail roof, curtain wall, cladding, window, floor, and other architectural systems, while also considering the detail requirements and capabilities of individual building materials.

    1.2 determine the size of mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems and components to meet project goals
    - you must also be aware of the related building systems to identify and develop mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems, including calculating the size of some system components, based on system type, system requirements, programmatic requirements, and other factors.

    1.3 determine the size of structural systems to meet project goals
    - you will need to be able to identify and develop structural systems, including calculating the size of some structural components based on the system type, system requirements, programmatic requirements, and other factors.

    1.4 integrate specialty systems such as acoustics, lighting, fire suppression, conveying, security and communications to meet project goals
    - you will need to be able to identify, develop, and integrate individual specialty system components based on system type, system requirement, programmatic requirements and other factors.

    1.5 determine how to detail the integration of multiple building systems and technologies
    - you must also be able to detail and resolve the intersection of roof, curtain wall, cladding, window, floor, structural, interior, and other architectural systems as they come together within a building project.

    1.6 coordinate mechanical, electrical, plumbing, structural, and specialty systems and technologies
    - you must identify and resolve conflicts between engineering systems (mechanical, electrical, structural) and other specialty systems as they integrate into the project. this also includes coordinating engineering systems with the architectural design to fulfill programmatic, system, and other project requirements.

    construction documentation

    2.1 determine appropriate documentation of building design
    - architects must identify a drawing and documentation approach based on project complexity, materials and assemblies, delivery method, and other project or construction related requirements. throughout project documentation, you must know how to refine, update, and make adjustment to the drawings to align with new or changing project requirements. throughout project documentation, you must know how to refine, update, and make adjustment to the drawings to align with new or changing project requirements.

    2.2 determine appropriate documentation of site features
    - architects must also coordinate with civil engineers, landscape architects, and other consultants to verify the documentation of site drainage, utilities, pedestrian and vehicular circulation paths, parking, grading, and other site features and structures. it is critical to ensure site documentation is coordinated with all project disciplines.

    2.3 determine appropriate documentation of detailed building drawings within individual architectural systems
    - you will need to resolve, detail, and document individual architectural systems such as partition types, expansion joints, windows, doors, louvers, stairs, and other systems based on constructibility, environmental, programmatic, and other building requirements.

    2.4 apply standards required to assemble a set of clear and coordinated construction documentation
    - as an architect, you will also need to determine the necessary drawings required to communicate an architectural design based on the project delivery method. this requires assembling these drawings into a clear set of construction documents and ensuring the quality of the documentation meets the appropriate standard of care.

    2.5 determine impact of project changes on documentation requirements and methods to communicate those changes to owner and design team
    - architects must incorporate value engineering, changes in scope, and owner or project team comments into the drawing set, and determine the impact of these changes on the project delivery method and schedule. you will also need to recognize when changes in scope or owner/project team comments require the architect to perform additional services.

    project manual and specifications

    3.1 identify and prioritize components to write, maintain, and refine a project manual
    - you will need to be able to determine and assemble the content of a project manual, including the general conditions; instructions for procurement, bidding, and contracting; and project specific requirements. this also requires the identification and preparation of any additional exhibits or special conditions required for project execution.

    3.2 identify and prioritize components to write, maintain, and refine project specifications
    - project specification types will need to be established, and you will need to identify which divisions are necessary based on project requirements. you will also need to analyze, determine, and specify materials within a project, including general, product, performance, execution, and other specifications necessary to complete the project.

    3.3 coordinate specifications with construction documentation
    - you must also establish fully coordinated specifications with information found on the architectural construction drawings and consultant documents. this includes all materials, assemblies, hardware, methods, and other identified information.

    codes and regulations

    4.1 determine adherence to building regulatory requirements (IBC) at detail level
    - it is critical to be able to apply the international building code to the design and documentation of a project, specifically building use and occupancy, means of egress, heights and areas, fire and smoke protection, MEP systems and structural systems, as well as material and assembly requirements.

    4.2 determine adherence with specialty regulatory requirements at the detail level
    - it is also important to be able to apply specialty regulations to the design and documentation of a project.. this specifically refers to the ADA requirements, energy codes, standards for historic preservation, IGCC, fair housing, environmental regulations, and the interpretation of provided local or site specific regulations

    construction cost estimates
    5.1 analyze construction cost estimates to confirm alignment with project design
    - as an architect, you will need to compare and modify a construction cost estimate based on the development of a project, including value engineering, substitution of materials, and alignment with the project documentation requirements. you will need to utilize appropriate estimating techniques based on the project type, phase, delivery method or other requirements.

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