Occupancy load for residential building.

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    Scott Barber

    The firm where I work does a lot of multifamily projects. From my understanding, we typically measure 200 sf/person for the overall floor plan and include the other spaces unless the other spaces are >10% of the floor area (leasing, amenity spaces, etc). When it's a mixed use we separate the occupancy load based on the different uses.

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    Theodore Diamond

    Scott is right on this.  For the exam you need to think based on IBC 2012.  Table 1004.1.2 tells you that you use 200 gross sf/person, so you need to include laundry rooms, lounges, etc.

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    David Kaplan

    We do a TON of hotels.  For the guestroom floors, we take the full gross square footage of the building footprint and divide it by 200, and there you go.  That's your occupant load.  Simple enough.

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    Sergio Ruiz-Alonso

    But what about corridors, elevator, stairways? does that get included in the area? no one resides in these spaces, so why should it be included ?? it really makes a difference when using the occupant load to size egress widths, etc...

    thanks,

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    David Kaplan

    Sergio,

    In the instances where the Code tells you to use gross square footage to calculate occupant load, in the case of a Residential Use building, yes, it's the entire footprint divided by the factor they give you.  The whole building.  This is the same for an office building, which is a Business Use.  Same deal there - you take the entire footprint and divide by the factor.  In the instance of the Office building, the reasoning is that those types of buildings very often change plans throughout their life.  Tenants leave, offices get totally renovated, and, very often office buildings are built day one as shell structures where tenants are not even rented yet, but you build the elevators, stairs, public bathrooms, MEP rooms, etc.  This is why the gross SF is calculated as such.

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