PDD and continental drift and plate tectonics

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    Scott Barber

    Hi Angela, I'm hesitant to answer that question directly as I'm not sure if it would violate the confidentiality agreement.

    That being said, I came across similar content when studying but don't think it's something that architects have to deal with very often and I wouldn't worry about knowing that in-depth for these exams. Could be something to be generally familiar with and how it may impact foundations, but I think it's not within the scope of the ARE exams.

    By the end of studying for PPD and PDD, I felt like I had a pretty good handle on what I could ignore or skim in each book. I frequently referenced the ARE Handbook (and this forum or other groups) to make sure, but I did skim over almost everything so I wasn't taken by surprise. That was just my approach based on the comments of others who said they got questions from way out in left field. I may have encountered a question or two that was unexpected, but that was about it.

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    David Kaplan

    I would agree - too detailed for the exams. 

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    ANGELA FERRIGAN

    That's what I thought too. I think this particular chapter is going way beyond what I need to know for the ARE. It probably wouldn't hurt to skim it if there's time, but I don't think I'm going to put a lot of time and energy into it.

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    David Kaplan

    If you're looking into Earthquake stuff, I gotta say, Chapters 4 and 5 of the FEMA earthquake manual really did it for me on both PPD and PDD tests.  It's really well written.  I also had an old Ballast book (2010) and I skimmed the earthquake and wind design chapters, but limited myself ONLY to concepts and design and completely ignored any and all calculations.

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    Asra Zaidi

    I don't think I can give specifics about that but I gave my exam 2 days ago, there was a question on a drift. which did involve knowing the equation Drift = (coefficient of something) x Height. After you figured out the drift you had to apply that information to a particular situation (to make a design decision). 

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    David Kaplan

    Asra,

    Different kind of "drift."  In your instance, it's the distance that a building sways away from vertical when affected by lateral loading.  The original question is referring to continental plates colliding and causing earthquakes - i.e. the actual ecological science behind what causes earthquakes in the first place. 

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    Asra Zaidi

    Oh my bad,

    I thought you guys were referring to the equation in FEMA chapter 5

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    ANGELA FERRIGAN

    This is all very helpful. Thank you!

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