PDD - done and done! Top 10 Tips

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    Jonathan Chertok

    pretty much all of these are remaining "unworked" equations because i can't find any material on them. and i keep running into threads where people are asking the same question and being told to ignore these as the info will be provided in the exam.

     





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    Jing Liu

    Great write up and awesome list of free materials. Wish I have seen it earlier but still thanks!

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    Roberta Militello

    Thanks Jing. Good luck with your exams. You got this!  

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    Jonathan Chertok

    where in the world do you find info on the equations provided as reference in the exams...?

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    Roberta Militello

    Hi Jonathan,

    I think you are referring to my statement, "Make sure you review the formula tabs in the demo exam and understand how and when you might use them." 

    The NCARB 5.0 demonstration exam has several reference tabs at the top of the exam interface. I reviewed each reference tabs (some list formulas/equations) and made sure I understood how and when to use each one worked. I hope that is what you were asking. Good luck with your exams. 

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    Jonathan Chertok

    yeah. the same one’s that are in the exam guide under “References Available When Testing”. no one i can see has figured out how to find an example of each on (with all the variable definitions). it would take me two weeeks of work to find each one and when figure out what they all do. maybe less but still a bait load of work on top of a boat load of work. seems like we should collectively put together a single reference that explains rhhnor we can track down some folks to share notes. i’m working on them (lighting being the easiest to find and structural second) but there’s no way i’m getting to all of them. there is probably 35 - 40 equations there in five or six different disciplines.

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    Jonathan Chertok

    hi roberta!
    also a thank you! i don’t want to come across like i am nothing you it you are the first person i have seen that recommends knowing these equations (if we are talking about the same ones which i think we are). everyone i’ve seen says ignore them you will be given what you need. but i can’t for the life of me imagine how this is going to be any good if i don’t even know what some of them are. you know what i mean? everyone seems to be at a loss as to where to go to get knfononthem with the exception of /some/ of the lighting/electrical questions...

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    Roberta Militello

    No worries - I struggled a lot too. One strategy that worked for me was to try to deconstruct the exam using NCARB materials, instead of memorizing (which just made me more frantic). The exam references for Acoustics, Electrical, Plumbing, and HVAC are short, so most of the topics can be found in the standard study materials. I also went through the NCARB videos and practice questions and made notes about the process for solving questions of that general type. For example, if there was a question about acoustic qualities of a wall and it mentioned STC, I would look up STC and the types of assemblies used for different design goals. I made notes about which resources had the best materials for particular topics. For example, Architectural Graphics has some really helpful drawings of wall assemblies and their respective qualities (STC ratings, etc.) 

    For the structural reference (which is huge) my strategy was to understand how to use the formulas (there are only four) and then develop a basic understanding of how to read the information in the tables. I did not memorize the steel manual excerpts, occupancy table, etc.. I familiarized myself with the information so I could locate and use it quickly and I also read through the exceptions. Then I found targeted resources.   For example, the Architects Studio Companion has some great overviews about occupancy and I also looked at related sections in IBC. I hope these examples are helpful. Good luck!

     

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    Jonathan Chertok (Edited )



    hi roberta,

    thanks a ton. honestly i find it quite confusing or i wouldn't ask.

    so, i plan to crack the four structural equations but to be honest i was just going to do it for kicks. i keep seeing things posted on the forum about just knowing how to work beam reactions. i constantly keep hearing don't worry about this list. you're the first that seems to indicate it is important and frankly i can't imagine going into the exam without reviewing them.

    problem is it is a lot of work to find all of them and no one seems to have any references for anything other than a lighting video for three of the lighting calculations.

    for instance i just reviewed the AISC tables and i was convinced that knowing the left side was sufficient and i wouldn't need to use the right side but from what i gather i better work those structural equations and know how to plug in some variables.

    also, at a year in - i would think at a minimum we would have a list of books, chapters and pages with the material to work each of the equations in the next post or there would be some notes collected that does the same.

    to ask me to scrape up all this stuff via google etc, etc, etc is too tall a task.

    do you happen to know if i can expect to have them covered in the BALLAST exam guide (big book, review guide and exam)?! 

    i guess i am saying i am desconstructing as fast as i can possibly deconstruct and these equations - and various and sundry other topics i may just not get to - are just not getting deconstructed...

     

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    Roberta Militello

    You may want to look on the web. For example, the HVAC equations above reference R, U, and K values. So, I would focus on finding materials that explain how those work and relate to each other: https://insulation.org/io/articles/k-value-u-value-r-value-c-value/. Just be careful to use reliable sources. 

    If you can afford to purchase materials, I found the BAllast 4.0 better than the 5.0. I took a lot of material out of the University library, but I rarely read things cover to cover.

     

     

     

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    Ancil Hogsed (Edited )

    Jonathan,

    MEEB (Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings) has all of the equations listed above and examples on how to use them. !!!Caution: MEEB is extremely dense!!!

    I'm using Ballast (Overview), MEEB (understanding fundamentals), and ASC (Heavily - to understand the different types of HVAC systems and their diagrams.)

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    Roberta Militello

    I Agree. ASC is a great resource for understanding HVAC, especially the tables that match system features to typical applications. I also read the Ballast overviews. 

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    Xiaofeng Zhang

    Thanks a lot for sharing this.

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