building construction illustrated and/or building codes illustrated?

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9 comments

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    Scott Barber

    Jonathan,

    I'd say Building Construction Illustrated is useful for both. Maybe a little more useful for PDD but it's still helpful for PPD.

    Building Codes Illustrated is helpful if you don't understand IBC, otherwise no need to study it in depth. I skimmed through it but didn't feel the need to study it as much.

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    Daniel Cancilla

    Building Construction Illustrated has pertinent information on bigger picture topics - ie. passive design, electricity, acoustics, plumbing, etc. This is all info that you'll need to be familiar with on PPD. I'd delve into the construction details in this book for PDD. 

    I liked having Building Codes Illustrated to supplement the IBC chapters for both PDD and PPD. I tend to be more of a visual learner, so the BCI (Codes) helped me better understand the concepts. It fills in some of the gaps in IBC by providing formula examples and diagrams. I purchased the one for IBC 2015 because it was cheaper and will have a longer shelf-life. It does a good job of pointing out what has been revised from previous codes. 

    Both of the books are worth having while preparing for the tests and are a worthwhile references to keep around the office. 

  • Avatar
    Jonathan Chertok

    hi scott and daniel
    thanks for both your help. i’ve enjoyed following both your posts. really helpful.
    i wonder if anyone might have the time to list chapters in each of these books for PDD and PPD respectively.
    it would go a long way to completing a study list i am completing that i will post for others....
    - jon

  • Avatar
    Scott Barber

    Jon, I feel like I've said this multiple times before, but the whole book is relevant. If you don't have time to read the whole thing you'll need to compare the chapters to your personal experience and may be able to eliminate a chapter or two. I'm pretty sure I read the whole thing - it's a good book and I don't think any of it should be skipped, the content will not only help pass the ARE exams but should also better prepare us to be architects.

  • Avatar
    Jonathan Chertok

    hi scott
    i don’t need to read books to be a better architect. i am already pretty good at what i do and have a healthy amount of post education research, reading and practice under my belt.
    i have read elsewhere that one of these books is more important for PDD and the other more importent for PPD and that both seem applicable to each exam (even through both aren’t listed).
    it seems to me that some folks have some insights into which chapters of each book would be best for each of these exams. i would find this helpful and others as well i think. also, getting a “mission critical” or “good but not absolutely necessary” or “skimmed this” for PDD and PPD would be helpful. i’ve seen this for other books from other posters but i can’t comment since i have not taken any of these.
    are you saying that reading both cover to cover for both PDD and PPD is top of list study material? or am i misunderstanding your reply?

  • Avatar
    Scott Barber

    If you look at my initial reply, I said that I don't think Building Codes Illustrated if you understand the IBC. So this will vary per person as to what should be read. 

    Building Construction Illustrated is more useful for PDD (again, see my initial comment), but it's relevant for PPD as well. Yes, the whole book is important. 

     

    I don't want to say it's impossible to come up with a comprehensive list of study material that applies to every person studying for the ARE, but any list created isn't going to be completely accurate. You have a lot of experience working, reading, and researching, while others are just out of school and haven't heard of radon mitigation systems or drawn more than 5 details from scratch. 

    The ARE Handbook lists all the books they used to create the exams (aside from ASC which seems to be missing) - so that should be the list everyone is using and then they can remove items from that list as they see fit based on their experience and knowledge. 
    Trying to go through an exercise of eliminating chapters from every book seems unnecessary. These books were written for professionals in architecture/design/engineering/construction, so the authors probably wouldn't have written a chapter about the proper ratio of ingredients to create cotton candy. 

    But again, if you want to eliminate chapters for yourself, you can compare the table of contents to the ARE Handbook and make an educated decision - but most people did this on their own. I would think with your healthy amount of post-education research, reading and practice you could apply that experience to do this. 

     

    I'll be honest - you've been asking a whole lot of questions that seem like they could be answered by googling and reading through posts on your own (which is what I've done before studying to create a customized plan for myself, based on my experience and knowledge). I don't know you or your situation, but I feel like I've repeated myself in answering your questions and I don't know how much more input I can provide. I don't mean to be rude and am not intending to imply that you're being lazy, but I think you have all the information you need to get started and take these exams.

  • Avatar
    Daniel Cancilla

    Definitely read building construction illustrated cover to cover. This will help you on both tests. You will dive into the construction details for PDD and the bigger concepts and design items for PPD. You will not be sorry that you read that entire book.

    Concerning building codes, most people agree that chapter 3, 5 and 6 should be read thoroughly. I would also add chapter 7, 8, and 10.

    You don’t want to skimp on any of these resources. You will not be over prepared if you read the entirety of BCI and the chapters I’ve listed for IBC

  • Avatar
    Jonathan Chertok

    thanks scott an daniel,
    i think i have daniel’s suggestion for building codes illustrated chapters. sounds like building codes illustrated the whole book is necessary.
    appreciate it! i sort of forget i am studying for both of these st the same time so to some extent there is no division between the exams i guess.
    APPRECIATE IT
    jon

  • Avatar
    Kurt Fanderclai

    Jonathan, I'll put it another way: You have literally been asking how to study for PPD/PDD for longer than the time it took me to gather materials, study, and take and pass both PPD and PDD.       

     

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