PcM how am I supposed to tell how close I actually was to passing?

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    Nick NCARB

    Hi William,

    Regarding your exam administration, a member of NCARB Customer Service should be in contact with you if they haven't already. Regarding ARE scoring, it is actually a very simple scoring structure. Each question on the exam is is worth one point. After you complete the exam, your points are totaled. If this number is at or above the cut score for that division, you will receive a pass. If not, you will receive a failing score. Questions are not weighted and there is no partial credit. If you do fail an exam, your score report will include information about how you did on each section of the exam. This is intended to assist you as you prepare for a retake. In your case, you did not meet the minimum performance in content area 1. 

    I recommend that you check out this blog post on scoring:

    https://www.ncarb.org/blog/are-50-what-score-do-you-need-pass

    and this Community post on scoring:

    https://are5community.ncarb.org/hc/en-us/community/posts/219849147-ARE-5-0-Scoring-System

    Hope this helps William!

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    William Cody (Edited )

    Nick, thanks for your time to respond. I understand what you are saying, but my point is that mathematically, the score doesn't make sense with the table that was provided. If I barely passed more sections with more questions in those sections, how does barely not passing one section fail (3) sections (2) of which were larger? If NCARB isn't going to issue percentages from each section and percentages overall, then why even bother? It feels like this system is set up to give people false hope in paying $100 for a "score verification". I guess if I had to sum up my feedback, it would be to either give us more information to go on, get rid of the "score verification" since you know it doesn't do anything, or both.

    I read elsewhere when someone was asking if there was a chance of an overturned test score and NCARB's response was "no test scores have been overturned in 9 years". Can you clarify why NCARB has such a policy if none have been overturned in 9 years? Can you see why this feels like predatory business practices?

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    nathaniel hocker

    William,

    I agree with you, 100%. Furthermore, why aren't we able to see what we've actually gotten right and/or wrong? After paying $210, and soon, $235, you would think we might be able to receive a printout of questions missed and questions we've gotten right to inform our study and even how to approach future questions, given each test is different . . . 

    Simply looking at several sections with percentages does nothing for future understanding of where we might've went wrong. Seems like a money venture to me - predatory business practice, indeed! Also, every time I have contacted anyone at NCARB, if I was able to get through; people have been all but cordial - rude, if I am honest, or have conveyed an absolute lack of care!

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    nathaniel hocker (Edited )

    I would also concur, and expand, that it isn't so much discouraging that you've failed, but a lack of transparency as to how you've failed, discourages candidates! I can't even begin to add up the number of times this issue has come up, in Kentucky, at least, the lack of transparency, a dumb way to score something that you really cant learn from.

    Mistakes are meant to be learned from, not guessed at, how one would do it better next time . . . It's hard to know with this scoring system in place.

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    Ancil Hogsed

    While I agree about the mathematical percentages reflecting an all or nothing stance (pass or fail); I think it is firm in protecting the public health, safety and welfare. In addition, this issue is well addressed and answered here: https://are5community.ncarb.org/hc/en-us/community/posts/115008705567-Exam-Score-Report

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    William Cody

    The whole test is for protecting the public health, safety, and welfare. But this particular test doesn't test almost any of those points, so why the secrecy? This test is essentially a test on how to run a specific type of firm and not giving information back about what was missed on the test considering this isn't information commonly shared with non-partner employees and isn't readily available anywhere, considering the AHPP doesn't cover a lot of what is on the test. That doesn't protect health, safety, or welfare. The only portion you could consider part of those is the ethical practices, which we maybe have 1 question per test.

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    nathaniel hocker

    I agree, again, William. In fact, when I took this test, I was not tested on much of anything to do with the subject matter. I was very disappointed that I had studied my tail off for a subject that didn't yield much of any return, I received a FAIL. 

    The health, safety and welfare aspect, is essentially irrelevant here, as this has to do primarily with practice (to Ancil). We are discussing scoring and the lack of transparency.

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    Ancil Hogsed

    My point isn't stating the obvious, but I think that the exam is purposely meant to be difficult so that not just anyone can read a book and put a building together. 

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    William Cody

    The exam is supposed to be difficult, not giving information on what is on the test, is where I have an issue. There is no "building" related information on this test, so I'm not sure how we are supposed to get this information.

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    Alicia Taylor

    I could not agree more with this feedback. Halfway through the Project Managment test I questioned if I was even administered the correct exam. The questions had little to do with the topics listed to be studied. The fact that you can’t even review the questions you got incorrect even after paying $100 is ridiculous. How about NCARB writes a study guide book and ensures all covered material on the exam is included? A large majority of the professors at Harvard GSD did not stand behind the ARE’s and now I understand why. This all seems like a money making scam.

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    William Cody

    I passed it on my third try, but only because I had seen most of the questions the first and second time through, not because I went back through the recommended study materials. The fact that I had to spend $400 and 6 hrs of my weekends to see most of the exam questions in order to take a fair exam is extremely corrupt, not to mention they just raised the price of each seat of the exam. It's a total joke.

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