Practice Management Questions?

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    Lindsay Clark

    For your second question, it's saying you should get the consultant's *fee proposals* before sending the complete proposal to the client. This isn't actual money, it's the fee the consultants are requesting. In this question, they had WAY overestimated what the consultants fees would be, and it ended up coming out of their profit. If they had waited until they had the consultant's *fee proposal*, they would've known to list a lower fee for them.

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    Brett Bowers

    Since part of your question has already been answered, I'll focus only on your question about instructional systems. These are typically drawings that identify default conditions to set the ground rules for how to interpret the drawings set. Examples of this would be drawings of typical mounting requirements (of fixtures, controls, devices, ADA, etc.) or RCP/lighting layouts - with the benefit being that you only then have to document the conditions that are exceptions to the rule. This will not only help an office standardize their documentation, but also reduce the overall number of drawings in a set.

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    Gang Chen

    This is a standard practice that most firms follow and is based on AIA documents. You get the fees from all your consultants, and add you own fees and prepare a proposal to the client. Once the client signs your proposal, you can sign your consultants’ proposal.

    Once you get paid for a certain percentage of the fee, you can pay your consultant the same percentage if they have finished their portion of the work to the same percentage. If you do not get paid, your consultants do not get pay. You never use your own money to pay your consultants in advance.

    Gang Chen, Author, AIA, LEED AP BD+C (GreenExamEducation.com)

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