PPD Practice Exam - Question Issues

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    Christine Williamson Cronin

    Hi Roman -

    Good questions.

    About #29: I think the constraint that matters most here is the amount of additional square footage required. Taking 2000 sf from the courtyard reduces its size by about 30 percent. Taking space from the rooms below completely eliminates them.

    Question 37: No insight. I agree with you.

    Question 49: You can right-click items to rotate them. I just took PPD & PDD about a week ago and had to rotate objects for at least a couple questions.

    Question 62: Skylights are pretty much always installed on a curb. This holds true for residential construction with pitched roofs, and also for commercial low-sloped (“flat”) roofs. Skylights are notorious leakers! Installing them on a curb and providing crickets reduce the risk of leaking substantially. The line on the right end of the roof is probably a gutter. Buildings with parapets usually have them along the entire perimeter, and those roofs are typically sloped to internal drains (not over the edges of the roof).

    Hope this helps. Good luck:)

    Christine Williamson
    www.christine-williamson.com

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    Roman Buha

    Hi Christine,

    Thank you for your quick reply, I appreciate all your answers and suggestions.

    Didn't know you can rotate objects by right click. Thanks for the tip!

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    Christine Williamson Cronin

    You’re welcome! I learned about the right-click thing from Michael Ermann through Amber Book. (That course was a lifesaver for me — it probably cut my studying in half). Anyway, good luck!

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    Valerie Galchenko

    #Question 37
    The answer assumes that the space on the north side of this site plan is "higher than 50 feet" - however, there is no contour line higher 50 feet on this site plan.
    I have placed on the northern area assuming it was 50 feet elevation. 
    Since there is no contour line - I understand that it is a flat area at the hight of 50'. - What makes you think it's a flat area? What if the slope goes uphill? Even if the elevation is 50.0000000000001 your answer will not meet the requirements, because the foundation of the turbine cannot be constructed at elevations higher than 50'.  

     

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    Christine Williamson Cronin

    Valerie: you're absolutely right. Thank you.

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    Roman Buha

    Valerie, I would agree with you that I can't prove that it is a flat area.

    In fact, it is unknown what is there. It can be flat, sloped uphill or downhill.
    So "the flat area" was just my guess.

    Therefore, since it is unknown - I should just use only valid data that is provided in a question.

    Sometimes it is just confusing because some ARE questions are extremely simple (like this one) and sometimes they are very complicated that require long math calculation.
    So it is hard to accept the potential simplicity of the question. My brain somehow wants to believe that all questions must be at least close to equal in complexity.

    Thanks for your comment anyway.

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    Warren Wigh

    So my advice is you're thinking too much into question 37.  It's a "problem solving" question that also incorporates reading topographic maps, and as you go down the criteria you rule out places you can put the turbine.  Let's walk through it step by step:

    Main paragraph says it's westerly winds.  Therefore anything to the east of the hill is a no-go.

    Item 1 says can't be close to the house.  So that rules out the hill the house is on.

    Item 2 and 3 talk about the houses' foundation at 35 feet and how your foundation has to be at elevation 35 feet or greater.  That rules out any elevation less than 35 feet.

    Foundation can't be higher than 50 feet.  That would include 50.1 foot elevation.

    In that case, taking this question at face value, that only includes the space that NCARB laid out in the answer key.  Anywhere in that box you aren't blocking westerly wind, you're above 35' but below 50', and you're not next to the house.  That's it!  Done with the question, move on.  You're saying you would put it on what looks to be a flat area at the 50' mark, but it doesn't work because it is above 50' (even by a little).  Plus, it's not a flat area.  There's not another contour line on the drawing, but the intervals are 5'.  So you could have a hump there or something that goes up 4 feet, but there's no contour line because it's still within the 5'.

    Only advice here is to not overthink the questions and take it at face value.

    For your other questions, others have answered them pretty well.

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