Building Codes Illustrated 2012 price??

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    David Kaplan (Edited )

    I'd like to chime in in regards to the comment above.  No - the 2015 codes really are not THAT different and I definitely think that anyone could purchase the 2015 Ching book and be absolutely, 100% just fine on the exams without fear that a changed code in 2015 will ruin you on a test based on the 2012 exam.  I do all the code research for my office and have done so for over ten years.  I am located in Ohio, which just adopted the 2017 Ohio Building Code (which is based on 2015 IBC), and we do many projects in surrounding states that are now on 2015 IBC, and I can tell you that I have yet to find anything major that has changed.  When it comes to main subject topics such as heights/area limits of buildings, egress width design, door sizes, etc. - this remains unchanged. 

    At the end of the day, knowing where to find things in the code is also as important as knowing the code itself.  You should know that a height/area limit question is going to be in Chapter 5.  An egress question is going to be in Chapter 10.  A sprinkler system question is going to be in Chapter 9.  The 2015 Code has not reorganized any of this from 2012.  NCARB will give you the code excerpts for the test.  So, if you know what section to immediately jump to, you can then check that section if you're at all concerned of a change between 2012 and 2015.

    I would offer one clarification to above: Table 503.  Table 503 in the Code dictates the height and area limits based on Use Group and Construction Type.  What they have done in 2015 is split Table 503 up into three separate tables: a table for building height, a table for allowable number of stories, and a table for allowable area per floor.  In all prior issuances of the code, this is consolidated into one table.  However - the info is the same.  They just present it differently, and in fact, it is clearer in 2015.  For the test purposes, know the 2012 version, which you can easily obtain on the ICC website as others have noted above.

    Don't spend $400.

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    David Kaplan

    I would also like to echo what folks have suggested above: study the actual IBC 2012 and don't rely solely on the Ching book.

    About 11 years ago the person in our office who handled code research left, and my bosses sat me down and told me that I would now be the new code person.  I was 26 at the time and had barely any experience with it, and quite honestly frightened at the task at hand.  The way I handled the situation is exactly how I would recommend studying for this exam:

    1) I bought the Building Codes Illustrated book, which at the time was the 2006 IBC, but did so to have it serve as a reference.

    2) I took home the actual IBC and went through it, chapter by chapter.  When I got to a part in the code that I didn't understand, I looked it up in the Ching book to get a nice graphic explanation of the concept.  It was important to me though that I become familiar with the terminology and language used in the actual code, which is why I focused on reading it direct from the source.

    3) I didn't memorize the IBC, but I did memorize how it is organized.  As I mentioned above, become familiar with which chapters cover what subjects.  On this test, and in real life practice, you will always have the ability to get out the code book and look up the answer to your problem.  Knowing WHERE to look for the answer is the key point.  I knew after a long enough time doing this, yes, I would eventually memorize various specifics of the code, but as long as I knew where to find them that is 85% of the battle. 

    Hope this helps.  Again, don't pay $400 for a 2012 Ching book :).  Shame on Amazon for that btw - unbelievable!!!

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    Kurt Fanderclai

    Susan and Michael -- part of Christopher's post sounds a little ambiguous regarding the IBC, but he seems to be looking for this book

    http://Building Codes Illustrated: A Guide to Understanding the 2012 International Building Code Francis D. K. Ching and Steven R. Winkel, FAIA, PE John Wiley & Sons, 2012 

    and not the IBC itself.  

    The Ching book has indeed had some crazy high prices on Amazon for the 2012 version.

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    Kurt Fanderclai

    Yeah, that price is inexplicable -- are there actually enough ARE candidates needing the 2012 Ching book to drive it's "value" that high?  Starts to sound a little gouge-y...

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    Michael Mezzetti

    ICC keeps a free historical version online at https://codes.iccsafe.org/public/document/toc/353/

    I would recommend reviewing the Architect's Studio Companion chapter "Designing with Building Codes" and reference the 2012 IBC as you go along. If there's something that you don't understand, ask the question here.

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    Christopher Olstein

    Hi All, yes sorry if there was any confusion, but I was in fact looking the Ching book "Building Codes Illustrated (for 2012 IBC)".  They have newer versions of this book for the newer versions of the IBC, but the exam itself is based on the 2012 IBC.  So if anyone knows where an affordable version of the Ching book can be found, please share : ).

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    Lilia Grigoryan (Edited )
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    Brian Starkey

    Yeah....you really need to remove that. I am pretty sure that's copyrighted material and you've posted a link to it.

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    Kurt Fanderclai

    And the link is for the 2015 version.

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    Christopher Olstein

    Yeah, again looking for the 2012. Guess I’ll just have to suck it up and buy one for this crazy price!

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    Michael Mezzetti

    My original reply was my apparently too-subtle way of saying that, if you don’t want to shell out that much cash for Building Codes Illustrated, there are other ways to understand what you need to understand about how the codes are used.

    In my mind, it is better to know the actual IBC. After all, when a reference is given to you in the exams, it will be from the IBC and not from the Ching book. It will help you much more in the exam - and in the long run - to become familiar with the actual code and how to use and navigate the descriptions, requirements, and tables in the code quickly and confidently. The Architects Studio Companion really explains the process very well (especially for that stage of design that Programming & Analysis is testing you on). Reading the ASC code chapter and cross referencing the IBC at the same time should give you that understanding and comfort level with the code that you are looking for. If after doing that you still don’t really get it, post a question here and people can help explain it.

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    Kurt Fanderclai

    Christopher, I would definitely not actually pay that crazy price.   It is just not worth it.

    I'm with Michael -- study the actual IBC 2012 -- for all the reasons he's mentioned.   I bought the Ching IBC Illustrated -- flipped through it, and never looked at it again.  I like Ching's books, but the code needs to be studied directly from the source.

          

     

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    Miranda Rogers

    Hi,

    You may have already found another solution, but I found building codes illustrated 2012 version for about $30 from vital source  e textbooks.  It's just an electronic version, but it's something. 

    https://www.vitalsource.com/

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    Christopher Olstein

    Hi Miranda, did you like that vital source version? I read a few reviews that said you basically need to download the vital source app which is apparently quite buggy. So much so that most of the reviews said to steer clear. Did you have any similar troubles? Thanks!

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    Susan Scarlet-Macaw

    Christopher,
    I have 6 books with Vital Source and it works for me. I still think you should get the 2012 International Building Code Study Companion. From IBC, it’s helpful for your career with the added bonus of helping you understand the code since it has commentary and examples.

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    Miranda Rogers

    Christopher,

    I use vitalsource for building codes and building construction illustrated.  Have the app on my phone and ipad and have accessed the books on my desktop and haven't had any issues. Hope that helps!

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    Leah McGavern

    Are the 2015 codes really that different such that buying and studying from the (much cheaper!) 2015 version wouldn't make sense?

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    David Kaplan

    ^quick typo.  Sprinkler Systems are in Chapter 9 :).  Typing too fast here!

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    Leah McGavern

    David, that was very helpful. Thank you!

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    Susan Scarlet-Macaw

    You don’t have to buy it it’s free online https://codes.iccsafe.org/public/document/IBC2012P12/chapter-6-types-of-construction

    thats just chapter 6, but the code is ICC is free. You can purchase the 2012 Study workbook companion from them too and that’s only $65. 

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