Took Construction & Evaluation - 03/15

Comments

9 comments

  • Avatar
    Kurt Fanderclai (Edited )

    Well done, sir -- 4 as an early tester!  

    I took CE a couple weeks ago -- any result for me is possible, but -- I thought it went well.

    How would you say that PjM (which is next for me) and PcM compared to your CE experience?

    Right now I'm plowing through the endless AHPP for PjM -- I also bought the Paul Segal book.  Besides a review of the contracts, that's my study plan.  Sound reasonable?

    Thanks for your input and recap.

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Daniel Spilman

    Hi Kurt, 

    Congrats on your pursuits so far! I would say your plan sounds very reasonable. For me, the AHPP was my primary resource for both PcM and PjM. Then I added a strong understanding of B101 and C401. You should already have a strong understanding of A101/A201 from taking CE. If you want to know which chapters of the AHPP I focused on, I can share that as well. Then you don't feel like you have to take on the entire behemoth. 

    Best of luck, sounds like you're on the right track!

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Daniel Ostfeld

    Hi Daniel,

    Great job!!! don't know if you got any results back, but good luck with all of them!!! 

    I took a different approach to 5.0 I've been studying for 3 month for PjM, PcM & C&E as a combo. Have been using Ballast 4.0 & 5.0 as well as kaplan, the AHPP, architect exam prep, Blackspectacles & pluralsight & shift harden lectures. Also Just got the new Brightwood Architecture (kaplan) C&E & PcM 5.0 study guides. I tested yesterday for PjM and felt it went well. I'm taking C&E in a couple of weeks and PcM 2 weeks after C&E. 

    Any other study material you would recommend for C&E? 

    Thanks!

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Kurt Fanderclai

    Wow, Daniel O. --   ^ quite a list of study materials -- ARE there any others?   :-)  I'd guess you are only partially visible behind a mountain of books... 

    I've taken CE -- given what you've studied so far, my two cents would be to print out and read the noted contracts word for word.  Familiarity with the actual document is always good, as opposed to only reading about them in 3rd part material.  Beyond that, I definitely like your study approach of three at once, and I would do it that way if I were starting over.

    Daniel S. has already taken the "trifecta" of exams that you are doing, so he is a better source than me -- however, I would expect that you are very well prepared for CE.

    I asked Daniel S. for his input, which he gave -- how about you, any PjM tips for my exam in two weeks?

     

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Daniel Spilman

    Daniel O. 

    I concur with Kurt, that is a ton of study material! Wow! Way more than what I used. I would say you should be definitely be sufficiently prepared if you get through all that. I have just a couple words of advice for you:

    First, make sure you run through the Demo Exam that you can access through your NCARB record. This will only take a few minutes but will help you feel comfortable with the exam format so there are no surprises on test day. Just get used to the navigation, flagging questions, jumping to exam summary, the drag and drop, etc.

    Secondly, always use the NCARB ARE 5.0 Handbook as your guide. With all your study material it may be easy to get lost, and get off base. Make sure you use the objectives outlined in the handbook to steer you. It will help keep you on track and avoid wasted time. 

    Third, I noticed you didn't list the AIA agreement docs in your expansive list of material. Of course these will be talked about in everything you read, but nothing beats reading it from the proverbial horse's mouth. Make sure you read the and know whats in them / not in them.

    Lastly, I know this may sound silly, but don't OVER study. There is no extra credit, no bonuses for getting a perfect score. Of course you should prep to the best of your ability. But you will get your license exactly the same if you get a perfect score vs. someone who barely passes. Don't waste your valuable time and energy over preparing. I've tried to adequately manage my resources to be well prepared but not burn myself out over-studying. Hopefully that makes sense.

    Best of luck to you! I'm sure you will do fantastic.  

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Daniel Ostfeld

    Hi Kurt,

    Thanks so much, my wife thinks i'm crazy as well. LOL!!! But, I'm all in on this journey and reviewing different study materials lets me see the same concept from different points of views. At least that is what i think. 

    PjM was my first exam so i was a bit nervous before getting into prometric. When the exam started i skipped the first 2 or 3 questions after reading them, when i got to the 4th i got more relaxed and started answering one by one till the end. Had enough time to go back and review all the marked questions and 15 mis to spare. I marked like 30 or 40 I think, even questions I knew the answer but wasn't that sure. Haven't taken an exam in 8 years, so the experience of the exam will help in the next ones, I hope.

    I think the PjM is very well align with the AHPP, I will recommend you to take a look at pluralsight's lectures and probably blackspectacles & Shift harden's lectures as well. It's a good way to review all the material in a more audio and visual way. If you already took C&E you should be confident with contracts, schedules, delivery methods.etc.There is a lot of overlapping between CE and PjM. because CE is one of the phases that PjM covers, plus everything that happens before the contract is awarded for construction.

    I will also recommend to practice a couple of case studies if possible to get used to them as well as practice questions. I got into the habit of doing lots of practice questions every day throughout the day, even while working. Some times i do 5 questions other times 10, 15 or even 100, depending on time. I think is a good way to get used to analyzing questions and answers. 

    Thanks and good luck!!

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Daniel Ostfeld

    Hi Daniel S,

    Thanks so much for the advice. Yes of course I've been reading and studying the contracts, I know it accounts for a large percentage of the exams. 

    I'm 100% sure I've over-study. I don't think is bad, it gave me the confidence that I know the overall context for the exams. It was my first one in years so a bit more of confidence was needed.

    I agree with you that using the handbook as a guide is a most!!

    Thanks for the input and advice, good luck in the next ones!!! 

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Merian Fuentes-Figueroa

    Hi all, thank you for your input. My question is do I need the CSI Manual of Practice for this exam or would Ballast, AIA Docs and Architect exam prep be enough? 

    Your thoughts would be greatly appreciated!!

    0
    Comment actions Permalink
  • Avatar
    Kurt Fanderclai

    Hi Merian,

    CSI Manual of Practice -- I read a lot of it, and in my opinion in wasn't worth the time for CE.

    The contracts are the ticket on CE.  I would urge you and everyone to actually read them all.  The Schiff Hardin Lectures -- online for free -- are great to listen to with a copy of the contracts in front of you.

    Ballast seems to be named as a good overview for CE -- I used the 4.0 materials as a review after the matrix materials.

    Good Luck!

    0
    Comment actions Permalink

Please sign in to leave a comment.

Powered by Zendesk