strategy with incentives

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    Justin Pelland

    I recommend taking advantage of the retake and $100 to the extent that you feel capable of completing the tests. There's a cushion with the incentives that makes taking a brand new, more or less unknown test format a little bit less risky but ultimately how you choose to utilize it will be up to what's makes sense for your overall goals.

    I decided to sign up for 4 exams between January 30th and February 23rd, but I had also studied for a month or two for the Practice Management division before they announced the free retests, so I weighed the value of free retests against my practical ability to take an exam a week and determined that if I really focused on studying, I could leverage my years of practice experience and do the absolute best I can on the first attempt. Worst case, I take some of the divisions a second time for free. The only real catch is your retest is only good for one year after the failed attempt, so don't sign up for more exams than you think you could finish over the course of the year!

    If you get reimbursed by your company for your exam fees, then the addition of the free retest makes it much easier to risk failing the first time if you feel confident you can pass it the second time.

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    SHAWN RYAN

    I think you're on the right track studying for and taking PcM and PjM together. There was a lot of similar info on there, and the info in those tests lays a good groundwork for subsequent tests from what I've seen. I took PcM first and while studying for PjM I remember wishing I had studied some of that stuff before I took PcM. You'll also get 2 gift cards, and 2 retakes if you need, instead of 1 of each if you did just PDD. 4 weeks is a bit tight to prep for both. But I say get as much info in your head as you can and go for it! 

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    Alicia Bernardo

    I agree with Shawn.  I think you are on the right track studying for those two together - A lot of information overlaps.  I think 4 weeks is plenty of time.  One key thing is to focus on relative materials.  As NCARB has mentioned numerous times, you don't need to read everything, in fact that would be a waste of time.  Reference the handbook especially, and really dig into what you don't know, if you feel comfortable with one topic/concept - move to the next!  

    Good luck!

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